China Statistics

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Contents

Introduction

China

This page links to the current online resources available to explore Chinese population and birth data.


Statistics Links: Introduction | Reports | World Population | World Fertility | World Infant Mortality | Maternal Mortality | Australia | Brazil | Canada | China | Germany | India | Indonesia | Europe | United Kingdom | United States | Australia’s mothers and babies 2009 | Australia’s mothers and babies 2008 | Australia’s mothers and babies 2007 | Abnormal Development - Australian Statistics | BGD Tutorial - Applied Embryology and Teratology | AIHW National Perinatal Statistics Unit | Category:Statistics | Category:China

Some Recent Findings

  • Neonatal Mortality Levels for 193 Countries in 2009 with Trends since 1990: A Systematic Analysis of Progress, Projections, and Priorities.[1] " In 2009, an estimated 3.3 million babies died in the first month of life-compared with 4.6 million neonatal deaths in 1990-and more than half of all neonatal deaths occurred in five countries of the world (44% of global livebirths): India 27.8% (19.6% of global livebirths), Nigeria 7.2% (4.5%), Pakistan 6.9% (4.0%), China 6.4% (13.4%), and Democratic Republic of the Congo 4.6% (2.1%)."

Birth

World population (countries more than 100 million)
  • At the end of 2009, the total number of Chinese population reached 1,334.74 million, an increase of 6.72 million over that at the end of 2008. The year 2009 saw 16.15 million births, a crude birth rate of 12.13 per thousand, and 9.43 million deaths, or a crude death rate of 7.08 per thousand. The natural growth rate was 5.05 per thousand. The sex ratio at birth was 119.45.[2]
  • At the end of 2008, the total number of Chinese population reached 1,328.02 million, an increase of 6.73 million over that at the end of 2007. The year 2008 saw 16.08 million births, a crude birth rate of 12.14 per thousand, and 9.35 million deaths, or a crude death rate of 7.06 per thousand. The natural growth rate was 5.08 per thousand. The sex ratio at birth was 120.56.[3]
  • At the end of 2007, the total number of Chinese population reached 1,321.29 million, an increase of 6.81 million over that at the end of 2006. The year 2007 saw 15.94 million births, a crude birth rate of 12.10 per thousand, and 9.13 million deaths, or a crude death rate of 6.93 per thousand. The natural growth rate was 5.17 per thousand. the sex ratio at birth was 120.22.[4]

Nutrition

  • 3% of infants with low birthweight, 2005-2009
  • 96% of households consuming iodized salt, 2003-2009
  • Unknown Vitamin A supplementation coverage rate (6-59 months) 2009
Data: UNICEF

General Statistics

Population 1,336,718,015 (July 2011 est.) country comparison to the world: 1

Age structure

  • 0-14 years: 17.6% (male 126,634,384/female 108,463,142)
  • 15-64 years: 73.6% (male 505,326,577/female 477,953,883)
  • 65 years and over: 8.9% (male 56,823,028/female 61,517,001) (2011 est.)

Median age

  • total: 35.5 years
  • male: 34.9 years
  • female: 36.2 years (2011 est.)

Population growth rate

  • 0.493% (2011 est.)
  • country comparison to the world: 152

Birth rate

  • 12.29 births/1,000 population (2011 est.)
  • country comparison to the world: 160

Death rate

  • 7.03 deaths/1,000 population (July 2011 est.)
  • country comparison to the world: 132

Sex ratio

  • at birth: 1.133 male(s)/female
  • under 15 years: 1.17 male(s)/female
  • 15-64 years: 1.06 male(s)/female
  • 65 years and over: 0.93 male(s)/female
  • total population: 1.06 male(s)/female (2011 est.)

Infant mortality rate

  • total: 16.06 deaths/1,000 live births
  • country comparison to the world: 112
  • male: 15.61 deaths/1,000 live births
  • female: 16.57 deaths/1,000 live births (2011 est.)

Life expectancy at birth

  • total population: 74.68 years
  • country comparison to the world: 95
  • male: 72.68 years
  • female: 76.94 years (2011 est.)

Total fertility rate

  • 1.54 children born/woman (2011 est.)
  • country comparison to the world: 182

HIV/AIDS

  • 0.1% (2009 est.)
  • country comparison to the world: 122

Major infectious diseases

  • degree of risk: intermediate
  • food or waterborne diseases: bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
  • vectorborne diseases: Japanese encephalitis and dengue fever
  • soil contact disease: hantaviral hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS)
  • animal contact disease: rabies
  • highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza has been identified in this country
Data: The World Factbook China

Abnormalities

Maternal and congenital syphilis

The following information is from a recent study of maternal and congenital syphilis in Shanghai, China, 2002 to 2006.[5] That has identified a resurgence of congenital syphilis, especially in the migrating population and other populations with a lower socioeconomic status.

  • A total of 535,537 pregnant women were included in the analysis.
  • 1471 maternal syphilis cases (298.7 per 100 000 live births) identified.
  • 334 congenital syphilis cases (62.4 per 100,000 live births) identified.
  • Both maternal and congenital syphilis rates increased from 2002 until 2005, with a slight decrease in 2006.
  • The rate of maternal syphilis was:
    • 156.2 per 100,000 live births in Shanghai residents.
    • 371.7 per 100,000 live births in the migrating population (p<0.001).
  • The compliance to treatment for maternal syphilis was poorer in women with a lower level of education.
  • The rate of congenital syphilis in infants born to mothers with incomplete treatment (50.8%) was much higher than in infants born to mothers with complete treatment (12.5%).
    • complete treatment group - rates of fetal death (5.5%), neonatal death (0.56%), and major birth defects (0.46%)
    • incomplete treatment group - rates of fetal death (30.4%), neonatal death (11.0%), and major birth defects (3.8%)
  • Infant outcome affected by initial maternal RPR antibody level and time of treatment
    • much better outcomes in mothers with low antibody levels and earlier treatment.
Links: Abnormal Development - Syphilis

References

  1. Mikkel Zahle Oestergaard, Mie Inoue, Sachiyo Yoshida, Wahyu Retno Mahanani, Fiona M Gore, Simon Cousens, Joy E Lawn, Colin Douglas Mathers, on behalf of the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation and the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group Neonatal Mortality Levels for 193 Countries in 2009 with Trends since 1990: A Systematic Analysis of Progress, Projections, and Priorities. PLoS Med: 2011, 8(8);e1001080 PMID:21918640 | PLoS Med.
  2. National Bureau of Statistics of China (2010) Statistical Communiqué of the People's Republic of China on the 2009 National Economic and Social Development
  3. National Bureau of Statistics of China (2009) Statistical Communiqué of the People's Republic of China on the 2008 National Economic and Social Development
  4. National Bureau of Statistics of China (2008) Statistical Communiqué of the People's Republic of China on the 2007 National Economic and Social Development
  5. Liping Zhu, Min Qin, Li Du, Ri-hua Xie, Tom Wong, Shi Wu Wen Maternal and congenital syphilis in Shanghai, China, 2002 to 2006. Int. J. Infect. Dis.: 2010, 14 Suppl 3();e45-8 PMID:20137991

External Links

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name.

Glossary Links

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Cite this page: Hill, M.A. (2014) Embryology China Statistics. Retrieved April 23, 2014, from http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=China_Statistics

What Links Here?
Dr Mark Hill 2014, UNSW Embryology ISBN: 978 0 7334 2609 4 - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G
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