Talk:2011 Group Project 11

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Group 11: User:z3308965 | User:z3292953 | User:z3308968 | User:z3272325 | User:z3284061

Plagiarism

--Mark Hill 07:35, 30 September 2011 (EST) Currently all students originally assigned to each group are listed as equal authors/contributors to their project. If you have not contributed the content you had originally agreed to, nor participated in the group work process, then you should contact the course coordinator immediately and either discuss your contribution or request removal from the group author list. Remember that all student online contributions are recorded by date, time and the actual contributed content. A similar email reminder will be sent to all current students.

Please note the Universities Policy regarding Plagiarism

In particular this example:

"Claiming credit for a proportion of work contributed to a group assessment item that is greater than that actually contributed;"

Academic Misconduct carries penalties. If a student is found guilty of academic misconduct, the penalties include warnings, remedial educative action, being failed in an assignment or excluded from the University for two years.

2011 Projects: Turner Syndrome | DiGeorge Syndrome | Klinefelter's Syndrome | Huntington's Disease | Fragile X Syndrome | Tetralogy of Fallot | Angelman Syndrome | Friedreich's Ataxia | Williams-Beuren Syndrome | Duchenne Muscular Dystrolphy | Cleft Palate and Lip


Group Assessment Criteria

  1. The key points relating to the topic that your group allocated are clearly described.
  2. The choice of content, headings and sub-headings, diagrams, tables, graphs show a good understanding of the topic area.
    1. Many good diagrams included in project. Quite a few lack a good description in the associated information and include only the original figure legend. There are a number of inappropriate names for files.
  3. Content is correctly cited and referenced.
  4. The wiki has an element of teaching at a peer level using the student's own innovative diagrams, tables or figures and/or using interesting examples or explanations.
  5. Evidence of significant research relating to basic and applied sciences that goes beyond the formal teaching activities.
  6. Relates the topic and content of the Wiki entry to learning aims of embryology.
  7. Clearly reflects on editing/feedback from group peers and articulates how the Wiki could be improved (or not) based on peer comments/feedback. Demonstrates an ability to review own work when criticised in an open edited wiki format. Reflects on what was learned from the process of editing a peer's wiki.
  8. Evaluates own performance and that of group peers to give a rounded summary of this wiki process in terms of group effort and achievement.
  9. The content of the wiki should demonstrate to the reader that your group has researched adequately on this topic and covered the key areas necessary to inform your peers in their learning.
  10. Develops and edits the wiki entries in accordance with the above guidelines.

Figure Assessment



Hey Fluer, yes if you can. When will the page be locked. Tahmina 1:37pm 13/10/11

Tahmina-do you still want me to add the australian stats to epidemiology??

Cleft lip or palate affects one in every 700 babies born in Australia. (http://www.cleftpals.org.au/about.asp) The national rate of cleft palate (1982-1992) was 4.8 - 6/10,000 births. This represents 1,530 infants, 5.5% were stillborn and 11.5% live born died during neonatal period. Cleft palate was slightly more common in twin births than singleton. The national rate (1982-1992) for cleft lip was 8.1 - 9.9 /10,000 births. Of 2,465 infants, 6.2% were stillborn and 7.8% live born died during neonatal period. The rate for cleft lip was similar in both singleton and twin births. (http://php.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=Lecture_-_Head_Development#Cleft_Lip_and_Palate) Australian Deaths from Cleft Lip and Palate: 2000: 3 males, 0 females 2007: 1 male, 3 females 2008: 4 males, 0 females 2009: 3 males, 0 females (http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Products/CA68D0ABFECFDCF4CA2578920015B9AB?opendocument)

i just realised i sent it to you but never got your opinion?

Fleur 10:04am 13/10/11

MEEDO- here is the link for the pie chart. I got the info off the WHO website however the chart is not a copy just the data. And ive copied the copyright thing below too.

http://www.who.int/gho/countries/en/

Copyright notice © Copyright World Health Organization (WHO), 2011. All Rights Reserved.

The information in the various pages of the WHO web site is issued by the World Health Organization for general distribution. The information presented is protected under the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literature and Artistic works, under other international conventions and under national laws on copyright and neighboring rights. Extracts of the information in the web site may be reviewed, reproduced or translated for research or private study but not for sale or for use in conjunction with commercial purposes. Any use of information in the web site should be accompanied by an acknowledgment of WHO as the source, citing the uniform resource locator (URL) of the article. Reproduction or translation of substantial portions of the web site, or any use other than for educational or other non-commercial purposes, require explicit, prior authorization in writing. Applications and enquiries should be addressed to the programme responsible for the page used.

The designations employed and the presentation of the information in this web site do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the World Health Organization concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there may not be full agreement.

The mention of specific companies or of certain manufacturers' products does not imply that they are endorsed or recommended by the World Health Organization in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. Errors and omissions excepted, the names of proprietary products are distinguished by initial capital letters.

The World Health Organization does not warrant that the information contained in the web site is complete and correct and shall not be liable whatsoever for any damages incurred as a result of its use.

RAHUL-sorry, i am hopeless when it comes to formatting references so i have no idea!!

I KNOW!!! The glossary is massive-please feel free to remove any words that you don't think should be there but I tried not to add words unneccessarily!! I am working on it now...

Fleur 9:41am 13/10/11

hey fellas- somehow or another reference 22, 24 and 25 are identicial. all under aetiology. i can't seem to correct it- i really don't know how. any ideas? this is rather urgent. i really need to get some sleep now. hope to wake in time. -rahul

edited all the reference links. all linked to pubmed as they should (the ones that are present there anyways). now working on aetiology citation. -rahul

Hey guys, I've uploaded the Pie Chart in Epidemiology, FLEUR, Could you please add the reference to it? or just give it to me and I will add it.

Now, as for Glossary, I was doing some of them but from the bottom since Tahmina did part of the Top half. I will continue doing the Glossary in the morning. If you guys want anything else, let me know. I will run through the project in the morning to scan and correct things. Great work everybody. .--Maqdad Al Saif 1:49AM , 13 October 2011 (EST)


ok I have done the first half of the glossary, couldnt find the def of three words. I have gone towards thebottom and done some there too. Tahmina 12:19pm 13/10/2011

there are so many terms in the glossary!! We have to take sections. I have done till 'E' and will continue to 'H', can you guys take 6 or 7 alphabets each and power through this pleaseeee?

cool, the following info was from the textbook which is in the references list:

• Cleft lip and cleft palate often occur together however have different aetiologies • Many factors cause this • Possible interaction of indirect genetic factors with environmental factors, or perhaps environmental factors alone • Cleft palate: 1 week delay in palatal shelve elevation in females, which occurs at week 8 as compared to week 7 in males o Errors in development include inadequate growth of the palatine shelves, failure of the shelves to elevate at the correct time, an excessive wide head, failure of the shelves to fuse and secondary rupture after fusion o Some mutations are linked to cleft palate and cleft lip

And this reference is for the the text below: Wong FK, Hagg U. An update on the aetiology of orofacial clefts. Hong Kong Med J. 2004 Oct;10(5):331-6. Review. PubMed PMID: 15479962.

• Cleft lip: underdevelopment of the mesenchyme of the maxillary prominence and medial nasal process o Pathogenic factors include inadequate migration or proliferation of neural crest cell ectomesenchyme, and excessive cell death during the developmental formation of the maxillary prominence and nasal placode o Some common drugs which can cause the defect include phenytoin, Dilantin, vitamin A, and some vitamin A analogs (Wong FK, 2004) • Alcohol, hypoxia, and dietary deficiencies (ie, folic acid deficiency) also have been implicated. Polygenic clefting describes a number of different genes with additive effects that result in a genetic predisposition for clefting.

Fleur 10:14pm 12/10/11

currently fixing the references for the entire page. some of them seem to be formatted incorrectly. we shouldn't lose marks for something so basic. -rahul

Fleur- I had taken the information for aetiology from the information you had initially gathered. would you be able to provide me with the appropriate references utilised so that i could incorporate them into the aetiology section? -rahul

hey guys- been down the whole day with a bout of food poisoning. gonna finish up now. last lap. hang in there people.

I am having difficulty finding anymore suitable images for our page. I still think we need another 1 or 2 images at least to balance text:image ratio. I am still editing the page-its taking forever because i have a slow connection. hopefully someone is on here soon :))

Fleur 9:12pm 12/10/11

Hey guys-if you have time, could you pls start filling in the blank terms in the glossary as i go? Beth is at work tonight so is unable to work on it til the morning. And there seems to be quite a few words missing since development and genetic config has been added.

Also, the biggest concern at the moment is there are no references in aetiology and development which I believe Rahul wrote/re-wrote. Can you please get those asap-don't want to be marked down because we forgot!

thanks guys-not long now :)))

Fleur 7:34pm 12/10/11

Hey guys, Ive started editing the page from start to finish focusing on spelling, grammar, and sentence structure-not content. I also am picking up any words which are not in the glossary yet. This may take a few hours but hopefully will help polish the page so that it reads well and marks are not deducted for silly mistakes.

Tahmina-I also havent decided what im going to do with pathophysiology, whether we keep it or not so will keep you posted.

Beth-are you able to check in a few hours on the glossary? If not, let me know. I am happy to complete it.

--Fleur 5:30pm 12/10/11

Hey meedo, the one i emailed you is not off Dr Hill's page. I took the information from a website and created my own pie chart. The one shown below is from Dr Hill's page but I would prefer to use the one I did? Should I just email Dr Hill and request permission in case we choose to use it? what do you think?? use one or both??

Also, the time stamp isnt working? Fleur 5:00pm 12/10/11

Update on the page, I have uploaded the animation of yours Rahul :). One thing though you forgot to include is what the numbers actually refer to? Well, I've added them based on what we had previously! only No.2 is missing. Could you please check it out by clicking on the image.--Maqdad Al Saif 2:21, 12 October 2011 (EST)


Hey Fleur,

Did you get the permission of Dr.Mark? So I can upload the Pie chart if you want. --Maqdad Al Saif 12:35, 12 October 2011 (EST)

ok cool. I know! The ones ive found are super graphic or really repetitive of stuff we already have. I've got class now but will have another look later tonight.

--Fleur McGregor 13:54, 11 October 2011 (EST)

Hey Fleur, the pie chart looks but i wouldnt know how to reference it. Same with the other pic, it would make it easier if it was from a journal. I did find some but they were kinda graphic and I wasnt sure if we were using really graphic pics.

Also, guys I've gone through the pictures and made sure they were all referenced right. Some were missing the student template and some didnt have the right referencing.

--Elizabeth Wren 13:49, 11 October 2011 (EST)


This is a pie chart from Dr Hills page. Would be worth putting in intro?

http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=cleft+palate+and+lip+images+from+journals&start=231&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&rls=com.microsoft:en-au&biw=1680&bih=848&tbm=isch&tbnid=8EIfBjT8PP7mRM:&imgrefurl=http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Notes/git2.htm&docid=Zro3N1vnjwiEYM&w=481&h=344&ei=v6yTTr3GCMHnmAXujbHsBg&zoom=1&chk=sbg&iact=hc&vpx=180&vpy=538&dur=3837&hovh=190&hovw=266&tx=136&ty=142&page=8&tbnh=135&tbnw=189&ndsp=32&ved=1t:429,r:8,s:231

another surgical photo http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=cleft+palate+and+lip+images+from+journals&start=231&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&rls=com.microsoft:en-au&biw=1680&bih=848&tbm=isch&tbnid=IEBt-cvkWN7fgM:&imgrefurl=http://topamaxcleftlip.com/topamax-injury/&docid=FXk60-5NYx2j-M&w=300&h=195&ei=Hq2TTvkdg8WYBdTxmegG&zoom=1&chk=sbg&iact=hc&vpx=836&vpy=484&dur=892&hovh=156&hovw=240&tx=152&ty=105&page=8&tbnh=141&tbnw=187&ndsp=32&ved=1t:429,r:20,s:231

if i can get an answer to the question about what sites i can get them from i will get all the info incl copyright, etc.

--Fleur McGregor 13:42, 11 October 2011 (EST)

Beth-good work! I am looking for images-can anyone confirm that they need to be from a journal or can i get them from a medical website??

eg. this surgical picture http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=cleft+palate+and+lip+images+from+journals&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&rls=com.microsoft:en-au&biw=1680&bih=848&tbm=isch&tbnid=tAlLiCRC5xw93M:&imgrefurl=http://bestpractice.bmj.com/best-practice/monograph/675/resources/image/bp/11.html&docid=PftV5kobZUxGSM&w=450&h=300&ei=66uTTr-KGYnmmAWjkp2LBw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=180&vpy=229&dur=2339&hovh=183&hovw=275&tx=154&ty=138&page=4&tbnh=145&tbnw=199&start=101&ndsp=32&ved=1t:429,r:16,s:101

i have class all avo, then i wont be home til about 8 tonight so i will be in touch then.

--Fleur McGregor 13:39, 11 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys here are some images I've found, not too sure where you want them though

From infancy until completion of treatment.jpg

Bilateral Cleft Lip With Nasal Deformity.jpg

Comparison of morphogenesis of the upper lip with the palate.jpg

Cleft Palate Maxillary and Mandibular View.jpg

Image shows the blood loss during lip and palate repair

Hope these are useful--Elizabeth Wren 11:26, 11 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys, unfortunately I was unwell last night & didn't get to look for images. I have a break today from 1230ish til 2 & plan on completing it then. Its looking good! --Fleur McGregor 09:30, 11 October 2011 (EST)

update: intro to environmental factors completed. aetiology section is completed. genetic configurations has been edited. in progress: referencing of the development section, expanding on the definitions within the glossary section --Rahul Mohan 07:00, 11 October 2011 (EST)

I reckon having a really fantastic Glossary is important, but I can see a great effort in Finishing all these Glossary words... However, I don't think it's that big of a deal to make glossary looks fancy? what does everyone think?

As for the tasks, I have done mine so far. and I changed the colours in the tables of Treatment and Diagnosis because they look too bright. Big applause for all of you :) Cheers. --Maqdad Al Saif 23:35, 10 October 2011 (EST)


Guys I've done the definitions for the words that were there. If you add more stuff and find new words for the glossary just add them to the glossary and i'll do the definitions. For the ones I did, i tried to keep them really simple so if people had no science background could understand. If you think i've made them too simple let me know and i'll change it.--Elizabeth Wren 20:41, 10 October 2011 (EST)

Good people. Pardon the delay- internet was a tad wonky for a bit. Here's a run down on what needs to be accomplished.

Intro for "environmental"- rahul Aetiology- rahul Change heading for "5 major prominences" diagram- meedo---> Done Already!! Find a picture for treatment- Fleur Recent Research- scheduled for tomorrow Glossary- Beth References for "development"- rahul Changing colours in table- tahmina

final lap people- lets get this done with. we're looking awesome so far.

--Rahul Mohan 20:25, 10 October 2011 (EST)

Hey Beth,

Glossary is looking Great at the moment but what would make it even better is if you have a look at Group 1 Glossary. Their definitions are quite readable.

cheers --Maqdad Al Saif 16:34, 10 October 2011 (EST)

Just parking unnecessray staff from different sections:

Cleft lip and/or palate have been identified to be one of the most common genetic abnormalities afflicting people worldwide [1]. It is known as syndromic when additional features are involved and non-syndromic in the absence of all other phenotypes[1]. The incidence of the condition is placed at 1 in 700 live births for the syndromic variant, with a male predominance in its occurrence, and 1 in 2000 live births for the non-syndromic variant-with equal affliction of males and females[2]. --Tahmina Lata 14:30, 10 October 2011 (EST) Neural crest cells forming craniofacial structures

Structure Generated Neural Crest Cell Zone
Premaxilla and Vomer The rostral aspect of the second rhombomere (r2)[3]
The inferior turbinate, palatine bone, alisphenoid, maxilla and zygoma The caudal aspect of the neural crest of rhombomere (r2))[3]
The squamous temporal, mandible, malleus and incus The third rhombomere (r3)[3]


Non neural crest cells forming craniofacial structures

Structure Generated Non Neural Crest Cell Zone
Cranial Base PAM from somitomere 1[4]
Parietal Bone Epaxial PAM from somitomeres 2 and 3 [5]

Hi Beth, yes please include all terms that a high school student would not know. Thanks --Tahmina Lata 13:57, 10 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys I'm doing the glossary now. Do you want it done in the most simplest terms of still have it sounding kinda scientific?--Elizabeth Wren 13:02, 10 October 2011 (EST)

Diagram indicating normal palatal development in mice

still having doubts about how aetiology, gen config and dev seem to repeat some issues. i'm considering merging it into one large section and then dividing it into 3 subsections. what do you guys think? --Rahul Mohan 04:15, 10 October 2011 (EST)

hey guys- regarding aetiology- i want to remove some parts from aetiology and place it under development as its more relevant there. what do you guys think? that would allow our sections to streamline into each other better. --Rahul Mohan 03:11, 10 October 2011 (EST) people- i need all of you to go through your relevant sections and fill in the gaps in referencing. i took some information from all your sections for the intro- and whilst filling in the missing references there, i've come to realise that some sections are lacking in referencing. so lets get that done? danke! :D --Rahul Mohan 02:27, 10 October 2011 (EST)

guys- i rearranged the sections a bit. but they still need working on. we need to think about the sequence of flow of information. thing is- while the content seems to flow (for the first half of the wiki, anyways) the headings seem off. like how aetiology comes after development. it just seems contrary to convention. but the content within- it flows between the sections. any ideas on how to make it better? --Rahul Mohan 23:39, 9 October 2011 (EST)

tahmina- under development- could be have the table bordered up? as in the table and its description enclosed in a box? it would make it easier to differentiate thet text below from the description if it were as such i reckon. not really sure how to though. --Rahul Mohan 23:29, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Dear Team.

Here's the Genetic Configuration and Evironmental :)

with formatting and stuff. the only 2 things missing are: an image and maybe the flow chart( same as the table in here)


Genetic Configuration and Environmental factors SECTION:

The origin of Cleft lip/ palate genetic and environmental factors arose since 1940s. A number of studies have been composed to elucidate the ambiguity behind this embryonic abnormality. It is believed that these combined factors contribute to the increase of Cleft lip/ palate incidence. Some of the genes that have been identified to have a vital role in the development of CL/CP include;


Genetic Factors Associated environmental Factors.
Transforming Growth Factor α (TGFA)
Smoking
Transforming Growth Factor β 3 ( TGF β3)
Alcohol
Muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1)
Diatery (Folic Acid)


Transforming Growth Factor α (TGFA) TGFA is regarded as one of the significant genes that have been studied extensively due to its relevance to the oral clefts. TGFA is a trans-membrane protein that is expressed at the medial edge epithelium (MEE) of fusing palatal shelves. The receptor of this gene, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is expressed on the defenerating MEE. In a study conducted on mice It was found that the deletion or alteration of this receptor contributed mostly to the facial medio-lateral defects and high occurance of cleft palate formation. [6] [7]


Transforming Growth Factor β 3 ( TGF β3)

Transforming Growth factor family consists of more than 30 ligands, which is believed to be involved in a numerous number of briological functions such as proliferation, differentiation, epithelium-mesenchymal transformation, and apoptosis. TFG β3 is a type of protein, known as a cytokine, which is involved in cell differentiation, embryogenesis and development. This protein was detected in the epithelial component of the vertical palatal shelf which peaks between 14-14.5 days, prior to the contact of the palatal shelves. Potential roles of the TGF β3 in cellular adhesion, and extracellular formation during the process of palate development have been demonstrated both in vivo and vitro. The alteration or mutation of this factor via smoking or other factors may result in the failure of epithelial cells during the development of palate to fuse together. Consequently, fetous is likely to develop cleft palate abnormality. [7] [8] [9]


Muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1)

Muscle segment homeobox 1 (MSX1) is a protein which is encoded by MSX1 gene. The transcripts of this protein are found in several locations such as thyrotrope-derived TSH cells, and thyrotropic tumor TtT97, pituitary cells, and most importantly expressed during embryogenesis[10] <refname="PMID10215616"> S Shetty, T Takahashi, H Matsui, R Ayengar, R Raghow Transcriptional autorepression of Msx1 gene is mediated by interactions of Msx1 protein with a multi-protein transcriptional complex containing TATA-binding protein, Sp1 and cAMP-response-element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP/p300). Biochem. J.: 1999, 339 ( Pt 3);751-8 PMID:10215616 </ref>. Due to the abundance expression sites of MSX family, it is hypothesized that these proteins might have an essential role in early development of embryo[11]. It has been discovered that MSX1, transcriptional repressor, to be significant in craniofacial, limb, odontogenesis, and nervous system development and tumor growth inhibition. Alteration in any kind including mutation of this gene may result in the formation of nonsyndromic cleft lip and/ or palate. The phenotypes of MSX1 merely depends on the locus of mutation which can affect the protein structure and function. For instance, Ser105Stop mutation was found to cause a complete deletion or absence of the MSX1 homoeodomain. This in particular impairs the development of craniofacial structures and cause clefts. [7]



Smoking:

Cleft lip and palate is considered to be one of the possible defects associated with maternal smoking. It was found that smoking cigarettes during the period of pregnancy sometimes is associated with cleft defects. The maternal glutathione s-transferase θ-1 (GSTT1) genotype, together with smoking was found to elevate the risk of cleft lip and/ or cleft palate by a ratio of 4.9. Moreover, the gene MSX1 genotypes along with maternal smoking resulted to even higher ratio of oral defects by 7.16 times. [7] [12]


Alcohol:

Several studies have shown that the teratogenic impacts of heavy alcohol exposure contributed to the incidence of cleft lip and/ or cleft palate. It was reported that about 9-18% of infacts who have experienced high alcohol exposure ended up with oral abnormalities such as cleft lip/ cleft palate[13] . However, a low level of alcohol consumption do not seem to elevate the risk of oral defects. The gene MSX1 was reported to be a major gene that could result in cleft palate or cleft lip. Furthermore, The Gene MSX1 is more likely to be altered with the consumption of four drinks or more. It was found that cytochrome Proteins may play a significant role in metabolism of endogenous morphogens in the developing fetus. Variants such as CYP2E1, or CYP1A2 were found to increase the risk of oral defects when they are altered or mutated. As a result, the structural development of the fetus is affected. [7] [14]


Folic Acid:

Maternal nutrition during pregnancy contributes highly to the normal development of foetus, especially oral and palate development. In studies conducted on mice, the development of palate was delayed due to the deficiency in folic acid supply. Moreover, insufficient dietary intake of B-complex vitamins, deficiency or excessive amount of vitamin A have been associated with high incidence of clefts formation. [15] MTHFR (5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is an enzyme of the metabolism of folate and homocysteine and is involved in substrate methylation and in the synthesis of nucleotides. The gene is located on chromosome 1p36.3. It was found that the absence or reduced levels of MTHFR could homocystinuria. It has been observed that a high level of homocysteine was detected in mothers with cleft babies as compared with mothers who have normal levels of MTHFR. It has been also hypothesised that variants of enzymes managing the folate metabolism contribute to the oral cleft formations. The Gene encoding encoding the MTHFR enzyme is known to have two common variants; C677T and A1298C. The link between MTHFR variants and Cleft lip and/ or palate incidences has been much less studied in the literature. [16] . [14]

Also the article of “ Complex genetics of Cleft lip and/ or cleft palate need formatting. --Maqdad Al Saif 20:21, 9 October 2011 (EST)


Hey Fleur,

This looks great! I will try and make either a table or a pie chart as the pie chart is something we haven’t done so far but depending on the level of complication of formatting I will let you know which one I can do. Are you able to prepare some text explaining the data though?

Cheers--Tahmina Lata 19:33, 9 October 2011 (EST)

hey tahmina,

ive emailed you a link to the graph and im not sure how to upload it onto here. let me know what you think/if its relevant.

--Fleur McGregor 19:27, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Sounds good. I have edited the pathophysiology without adding anything else of my own to it at this stage as I wanted to try and use most of what you had done meedo (coz I know you worked hard on it). Is this a little more understandable? I feel this section does not need a huge amount of detail as thats whats being explained in genetic configuration and development. agreed?

Pathophysiology SECTION:

The embryonic development of the upper lip and nose requires a precise genetic sequence of events. This cranio-facial development pathway is a very complex process and therefore there are several points during development at which cleft lip or palate can occur. During the third and eighth week, five major facial prominences are fused together. The lips then develop between the third and seventh week followed by the palate between the fifth and twelfth week. Due to this intricate process, multiple genetic and environmental factors will vary in their affect on the type and severity of cleft lip and palate and lead to the malfunction of the various tissues involved.

[Insert one of the Drawings from the 3 below]

The maxillary, medial nasal and lateral prominences fuse together via a combination of processes including apoptosis, epithelial bridging and subepithelial-mesenchymal penetration [insert photo for the convergence]. Cleft lip and cleft palate result when these tissues fail to fuse. Some research suggests that this abnormality is secondary to a defect of mesenchymal growth or epithelial bridging. There is evidence that intracellular signaling pathways and a wide range of errors in genetic programming may interfere with the fusion of median nasal and maxillary prominences. Consequently, the blood supply and musculature are often compromised and lead to malfunction of the lip and palate.

For example, in a unilateral cleft lip, the deep fibres of the orbicularis oris muscle are interrupted by the presence of the cleft and insert into the nasal base (the side of the defect), however, in a normal infant, these muscles will form a concentric muscle around the mouth. Furthermore, the superficial layer of the orbicularis oris muscle changes direction and forms superiorly, parallel to the edges of the cleft and inserts inferior to the columella. This can be seen when infants smile as the base of the nose would spread out laterally.

Usually, fusion of both lateral palatal shelves as well as nasal septum in the anterior posterior direction from the incisive foreman (key landmark in the bony palate-glossary) to the uvula is essential for the palate development to progress [ADD photo]. The occurrence of cleft palate is often linked with a split uvula. Functional impairment and secondary complications often occur with the gap between both the nasal and oral cavities including problems with speaking, ear infections/hearing loss, aesthetic problems, dental anomalies, psychosocial problems and hyper-nasal voice resonance due to the leakage of air from the nasal cavity.

--Fleur McGregor 19:13, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Dear Team,

It is great to see that we are all on board now. I haven't heard from Beth yet but I think the page is going to be a knockout considering the progress that has been achieved so far. Now to summarise this is what is happening:

Tonight:

Meedo-completing Genetic and environmental influences on clefting(including one image for this secion. Also writing Aetiology as it is more relating to his section.

Rahul-completing Development(adding an intro paragraph to development) and adding any other info he sees fit. Also completing current research.

Fleur-rewriting Pathophysiology and adding a graph for epidemiology including a brief discussion about the prevalence of clefting in Australia.

Meedo, the images for Pathophysio are great! Well done. Just wondering if you are able to darken the outlines of these images so it is a better resolution when they are uploaded? Having more than one student drawn image really makes the page look authentic and gives it a character. so I am quite keen on adding as many of them as we can obviously as long as it is relevant to Fluer's text on the topic.

We are hoping to have everything uploaded tonight so we can ask Dr Hill for an opinion tomorrow.

Tomorrow

  • First I am going to try to get help from Dr Hill so we can get the page back!
  • Then we(Rahul and I) will try to make an appointment with Dr Hill and get him to help us with the technical problems in terms of uploading images.
  • Then once the page is up we will look into editing and formatting and most importantly completing the glossary.

So that is the plan at this stage. We will be in touch and please let me if you require any alterations to these.--Tahmina Lata 18:46, 9 October 2011 (EST)


http://nursingcrib.com/nursing-notes-reviewer/maternal-child-health/cleft-lip-and-palate/

an awesome picture on this website...the one with 9 squares. not sure if we need anymore images though??

--Fleur McGregor 18:01, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Sorry to confuse you. That is what we have agreed Rahul-keep development as a standalone section, and then go onto a brief section of aetiology and then go onto genetic config- since there's more of a link between aetiology and genetic config.

This is to be added to epidemiology so please don't touch at this stage.

EPIDEMIOLOGY: Cleft lip or palate affects one in every 700 babies born in Australia. (http://www.cleftpals.org.au/about.asp) The national rate of cleft palate (1982-1992) was 4.8 - 6/10,000 births. This represents 1,530 infants, 5.5% were stillborn and 11.5% live born died during neonatal period. Cleft palate was slightly more common in twin births than singleton. The national rate (1982-1992) for cleft lip was 8.1 - 9.9 /10,000 births. Of 2,465 infants, 6.2% were stillborn and 7.8% live born died during neonatal period. The rate for cleft lip was similar in both singleton and twin births. (http://php.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=Lecture_-_Head_Development#Cleft_Lip_and_Palate) Australian Deaths from Cleft Lip and/or Palate: 2000: 3 males, 0 females 2007: 1 male, 3 females 2008: 4 males, 0 females 2009: 3 males, 0 females http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Products/CA68D0ABFECFDCF4CA2578920015B9AB?opendocument)

--Fleur McGregor 17:43, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Fleur- i thought we were gonna keep development as a standalone section, and then go onto a brief section of aetiology and then go onto genetic config- since there's more of a link between aetiology and genetic config. mm. or i thought that was what's going on. could tahmina clarify? --Rahul Mohan 17:38, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Hey rahul,

I was going to expand on it a bit more if we didnt combine sections however there is only so much i can say without doubling up on development hence the idea of combining. Im happy to keep them separate if thats best too?

there were the dot points then i pasted that other stuff further up the discussion under aetiology as well. does this clarify things?

so i just spoke to tahmina...just clarifying that meedo you are taking on aetiology now and i am working on improving pathophysiology text that you have written?

also meedo, im happy with the image so far but i will re-evaluate when its in its correct format on the oage. But at this stage, no change is required :)

--Fleur McGregor 17:22, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Too bad, we can't see the page. I think the aetiology and development combined could look good. But I reckon combining them when they are completely different titles, may not a great idea now! since we can't see both sections together. I don't know. I haven't read the page completely yet. Once we get it back, we can decide. For now, My vote is neutral :)

Thanks Fleur, IS there anything in particular all of you want me to add for the image?

Aetiology looks fantastic from the work.

I reckon final touches when we check the page as a whole, would make it phenomenoal.

I will help in other sections once I'm done with the Genetic :)

Cheers Team.

--Maqdad Al Saif 17:10, 9 October 2011 (EST)

alright- so we're gonna combine aetiology and dev. the points you listed below-is that all that aetiology is gonna be? if so- i'll put both together into one section. intro needs to be changed too. fleur could you clarify this? danke! our page is definitely coming together well. at this rate, its gonna be one of the best. looking forward.

--Rahul Mohan 16:52, 9 October 2011 (EST)

tahmina...i think that this might be some of the epidemiology stuff that was on the page??

Like many other congenital conditions prevalence of associated anomalies with cleft palate or lip has different rate and patterns of occurrence among different populations. At birth white population has higher prevalence than black population. Oral cleft in black population has been reported to have clubfoot and polydactyl as an associated anomaly as opposed to other ethnic population.[17].The reason for this is supposedly because these two anomalies are more common in the black population in general.[18] Cleft lip is more prevalent in males while cleft palate is more prevalent in females, the ratio between females and males being 60:40. From research, neither age nor parity appear to be directly related is both abnormalities. There is a higher occurance in Japanese people and lower occurance in Negro populations. The frequency of this birth defect is about 1 in 2,000 newborns in white populations.

--Fleur McGregor 16:51, 9 October 2011 (EST)

More aetiology stuff...

Genetic factors contributing to cleft lip and cleft palate formation have been identified for some cases, however, knowledge about genetic factors that contribute to the more common isolated cases of cleft lip/palate is still uncertain. Many clefts run in families, even though in some cases there does not seem to be an identifiable syndrome present, possibly because of the current incomplete genetic understanding of midfacial development. In some cases, cleft palate is a secondary issue caused by some syndromes or chromosome disorders. For example, Patau syndrome, Hardikar syndrome, Stickler’s syndrome, Treacher Collins syndrome and Loey-Dietz syndrome. The development of the face is coordinated by complex morphogenetic events and rapid proliferative expansion, and is thus highly susceptible to environmental and genetic factors. During the first six to eight weeks of pregnancy, the shape of the embryo's head is formed. During this time, primitive tissues form and if these tissues fail to fuse, a gap appears. This may happen in one, several or all locations. These back portions are called palatal shelves, which grow towards each other until they fuse in the middle.This process is very vulnerable to multiple toxic substances, environmental pollutants, and nutritional imbalance. The biologic mechanisms of mutual recognition of the two cabinets, and the way they are glued together, are quite complex and obscure despite intensive scientific research.[20]

--Fleur McGregor 16:49, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys!

that is devastating about our page...fingers crossed Dr Hill can recover it tomorrow!!

apart from that dilemma...i can see you boys really worked hard last night so well done. from yesterday afternoon, alot of work as been done and we are really coming together as a team! so congrats to all of you!

meedo-the drawings look fantastic!!! im really impressed. I vote for drawing number 1 for the intro but i think they are all excellent.

i am currently working on a few things (obviously limited until the page is up again)...I am doing a bit of epidemiology and going to help with pathophysiology to get it polished. Tahmina and I decided that it would be best to combine aetiology and development to make a more complete section as the information is similar. Is everyone ok with that? So Rahul, that intro you are working on for development you can make it an aetiology focus to intro development...here is some of the aetiology stuff i had in dot point (i didnt save a final copy)

• Cleft lip and cleft palate often occur together however have different aetiologies • Many factors cause this • Possible interaction of indirect genetic factors with environmental factors, or perhaps environmental factors alone • Cleft palate: 1 week delay in palatal shelve elevation in females, which occurs at week 8 as compared to week 7 in males o Errors in development include inadequate growth of the palatine shelves, failure of the shelves to elevate at the correct time, an excessive wide head, failure of the shelves to fuse and secondary rupture after fusion o Some mutations are linked to cleft palate and cleft lip • Cleft lip: underdevelopment of the mesenchyme of the maxillary prominence and medial nasal process o Pathogenic factors include inadequate migration or proliferation of neural crest cell ectomesenchyme, and excessive cell death during the developmental formation of the maxillary prominence and nasal placode o Some common drugs which can cause the defect include phenytoin, Dilantin, vitamin A, and some vitamin A analogs (Wong FK, 2004) • Alcohol, hypoxia, and dietary deficiencies (ie, folic acid deficiency) also have been implicated. Polygenic clefting describes a number of different genes with additive effects that result in a genetic predisposition for clefting. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1280866-overview


hopefully thats helpful for you Rahul.

anyways, unfortunately i didnt get to see alot of the content uploaded last night but am looking forward to seeing our page tomorrow. I think it will look great! Weve certainly come along way!!

--Fleur McGregor 16:41, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Hello Guys,

As per our previous conversations, Since the pathophysiology is standing out much within the group standards, and you would like to make big modifications. I've uploaded the prior work of mine along with the images I've drawn( if you would like me to label them and add colours) please let me know. As I'm not sure whether you need them or not. But in general this is what they will look like. Also, the Ultrasound Images that has been uploaded could be handy.

Note: if you can, try not to delete the whole section. I did a lot of work on it.

Pathophysiology SECTION:

The Development of upper lip and nose in embryos involves a series of genetically programmed procedures. This includes the fusion of five major facial prominences, that occur in gestation period between the third and eighth week. The palate develops within the fifth and twelfth week while lip develops between the third and seventh week. [Insert one of the Drawings from the 3 below]


The cranio-facial development pathway is a very complex process. Since the several points of development at which “Clefting” might occur is based on the condition and the wide range of its phonotypical expression.


In the case of Cleft Lip or palate, there’s a converge of maxillary, medial nasal and lateral prominences via a combination of few processes that include apoptosis ”programmed cell death”, epithelial bridging and subepithelial-mesenchymal penetration[insert photo for the convergence]. Cleft lip or palate are found to be secondary to a defect of mesenchymal growth or the epithelial bridging. There has been evidence stating that intracellular signalling pathways and a wide range of genetic loci may play a potential role in elucidating this abnormality. These possible proposals could cause the fusion of median nasal and maxillary prominences to be disturbed. Consequently, the blood supply in bilateral cleft lip and/or palate, especially the arterial network and musculature of the lateral elements seems to be similar to the lateral segment of the unilateral deformity. The blood vessels and muscle fibers run along the margins of the piriform aperture and prolabial segment toward the and run columella , where they anastomose with nearby vessels(pre-maxillary vessels.


In the unilateral cleft lip: the deep fibres of the orbicularis oris muscle are disturbed by the presence of the cleft and insert on the side of the defect (nasal base) as compared to the normal infant, these muscles will make their way around the mouth. Furthermore, the superficial component of the orbicularis oris changes direction and head superiorly, parallel to the edges of the cleft and insert inferior to the columella. This can be seen when infants smile as the base of the nose would splay laterally.


In cleft palate: Clefts of the palate are seem to be associated with bony and soft-tissue abnormalities. Usually, fusion of both lateral palatal shelves as well as nasal septum in the anterior posterior direction from incisive foreman ( key landmark in the bony palate ) to the uvula is essential for the palate development to progress[ADD photo]. As mentioned previously, the cleft palate is often formed the palatal development is disturbed between the 5th and 12th week of gestation. The occurrence of Cleft palate is often associated with a split uvula. Some issues are associated with the gap between both the nasal and oral cavities. These includes problems in speaking ear infections/hearing loss, aesthetic problem, dental anomalies, psychosocial problems and hyper-nasal voice resonance due to the leakage of air from the nasal cavity [19] [20] [21]


Here are the images for Pathophysiology section.

Pathophyis 1.jpg Pathophysiology 2.jpg Pathophysiology & development.jpg

--Maqdad Al Saif 16:08, 9 October 2011 (EST)

roger that. workin on it. updated dev should be up within the hour. wanna include a bit more info.

--Rahul Mohan 15:22, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Hey Rahul, can you also add a quick introductory paragraph to the development? Like a summary explaining what is it exactly that causes cleft lip and palate and then ease into the developmental staging discussion? --Tahmina Lata 14:51, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Rahul, I thought the gif and the jpeg uploading is exactly the same?? Have you tried to upload it using the same coding as the image uploading?--Tahmina Lata 10:10, 9 October 2011 (EST)

oh- and the gif image- i'm going to edit again to include more labels of the different processes, to further ease the understanding of the reader. figured out how to include the initial image provided by beth as well. so all in all, under development, we'll have the animation, the time line and the image of the development of the palate.

i'm going to need our text back to start editing the various sections. there's much to be done still. and can someone please help me out by telling me how to have a gif image show on the wiki? i can't seem to find any examples so far.

--Rahul Mohan 04:32, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Development

The palate and the lips are developed from 3 of the 5 prominences that surround the stomodeum of the fetus: the frontonasal prominence, the right maxillary prominence and the left maxillary prominence.

At stage 14 of the Carnegie staging system, the surface ectoderm of the ventrolateral part of the frontonasal prominence undergoes thickening to form the nasal placodes. The remaining portions of the frontonasal processes then grow and bulge around these placodes to form the nasal pits and the nasal processes. The mesenchyme of the maxillary process continues to grow, pushing the nasal pits medially. The upper lip consists of the maxillary processes and both the medial and lateral nasal processes- which have commenced fusion.

At stage 15- the maxillary and medial nasal processes undergo rapid growth and push the lateral nasal processes rostrally. The medial nasal process and the maxillary process also undergo fusion distally. Active fusion takes place between the lateral nasal and medial nasal processes- commencing initially at the posterior part of the nasal pits, and proceeding henceforth in an anterior direction.

From stage 16 to 18, epithelial fusion continues between the maxillary, and the 2 nasal processes. The maxillary processes continue fast growth and this results in the protrusion of the nasal pits and medial nasal processes mediofrontally. The ongoing growth and confluence of the medial nasal and maxillary mesenchyme result in the groove located in between the medial nasal processes leveling out and becoming smooth. Fusion between the medial and lateral nasal processes takes place, resulting in nasal pits to be transformed into nasal chambers and ducts.

Stage 18 heralds the connection of the nostrils to the posterior oral cavity. The medial nasal and maxillary processes also undergo fusion, resulting in the remodeling of the lower edge of the nostrils. By stage 19, the epithelial seams and the mesenchymal confluence between the medial nasal and maxillary processes disintegrate, thereby completing the formation of the upper lip.

During this stage, at about day 45, bilateral palatal shalves arise from the maxillary processes. Initially, these processes grown vertically down the side of the tongue, but then subsequently elevate to a horizontal position about the dorsal surface of the tongue. A midline epithelial seam, which undergoes degeneration to form a continuous mesenchyme, is then formed as the medial edge of the palatal shelves fuse. In the mesenchyme of the hard palate, the osteogenic blastemata for the palatal processes of the maxillary and palantine bones differentiate, while in the soft palate, patterned myogenic blastemata develop.

Palatal development usually ends (trying to find out an approximation that fits here.)


(this is just the section on the development of the palate and the upper li. still to come: information about how clefting in the palate can happen due to a disturbance in any of these processes during the palate development. trying to find more information on where and what causes clefting in the upper lip. Tahmina- could you edit the bar timeline thingum to indicate that palate development is from stage 14 to stage 18 <including> that should be sometime in mid week 5 to almost the end of week 7)

off to bed. really need a snooze. more tomorrow.

--Rahul Mohan 03:59, 9 October 2011 (EST) --Rahul Mohan 04:26, 9 October 2011 (EST)


hey guys- looks like this page is still not back yet. anw, i took a look at Dr Hill's work- he's used actual movies, whereas our pic is a gif image. anyone has any idea? working on dev still. --Rahul Mohan 02:56, 9 October 2011 (EST)

People,

Just so you know, I should have my genetic configuration done by Sunday. As I'm doing a big modification. Also, Pathophysiology I'll revise it again. :)

forgot to mention, the image of the Introduction is not finalized yet, I will modify it a bit but will need all of your comments and feedback.

Nice progress team--> I saw the development changes before the page disappears. I start to like the page more...

Keep it up team.

--Maqdad Al Saif 01:12, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Yea, I checked that!!!!! It seems to be done after 12:00AM. I had a look at other pages, but their content is still there!!!!

We shall contact Dr.Hill tomorrow in regards to this issue.

--Maqdad Al Saif 00:53, 9 October 2011 (EST)


Everyone!!!!

Our page is gone...I emailed Dr Hill and also sent him a screen shot. I dont think he will reply before Monday. I am hoping he will check is email tomorrow. This is so bad! What do we do now!!!!!

--Tahmina Lata 00:28, 9 October 2011 (EST)

Guyss,

You might wanna check the page... because everything has disappeared. the only thing left is the introduction.

So what happens now?

Rahul- you may wanna check some of Dr.Hill Tutorials or some of his lectures. consider the format of animation.

--Maqdad Al Saif 00:10, 9 October 2011 (EST)

guys, i need help. i've put together the gif image- but it doesnt seem to show. any idea how to embed it into the wiki? (http://php.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=File:Palate_and_lip_development_animation.gif)

--Rahul Mohan 23:32, 8 October 2011 (EST)


Hello People,

Sorry the uploading took longer than what I expected.

Anyways, here are all the images.

Introduction:

File:Introduction 1.jpg
Cleft palate and lip
File:Intro2.jpg
Cleft palate and lip
Cleft palate and lip
Cleft palate and lip


Ultrasound:

Figure 1. Fetal Lip and Primary Palate Three dimensional versus Two dimensional US.gif
Figure 2. Fetal Lip and Primary Palate Three dimensional versus Two dimensional US.gif
Figure 3. Fetal Lip and Primary Palate Three dimensional versus Two-dimensional US.gif

Development:

Development1.jpg
Development 2.jpg
Development 3.jpg


why there are 4 images for introduction, it is for you guys to decide which one will look better as an intro image. So choose 1.

Sorry but it takes a lot of time to complete the drawings and make them as presentable as possible.

The ultrasound. I will upload them on the page. You are free to move them around.

Development- Rahul, I think now, you are free to make the animation. Also, I have emailed you a higher resolution ones, since the website is a little slow in uploading images greater than 1MB.

Now, I think I have completed my duty in the drawing part. But do not forget to vote on which image for the introduction.

Is everyone happy now so far?

I'm working on the genetic and proof reading the Pathophysiology.

If you have anything to say, please do so.

Regards,

--Maqdad Al Saif 22:04, 8 October 2011 (EST)


Fellas,

Intro has been completed- save for the section on future research- tried to briefly summarise and give an overview of the entire wiki. In going through, i noticed some disparities that we've come up with in all sections. For instance- can we standardise CL/P to stand for cleft lip and/or palate? and CL for cleft lip, and CP for cleft palate. If everyone's in agreement with this- I'll get the change made throughout all the sections. Working on development now.

--Rahul Mohan 20:43, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Hello, Teams,

My input is I'm uploading the images(including the Introduction image) within an hour. And about the Genetic configuration, I'm working on it, but first, I'll hand over all the images.

  • Please be more considerate, I'm uploading all of them before 9:00PM
  • I will proofread the sections and edit the sections I have done to make it more presentable.

Regards,

--Maqdad Al Saif 19:56, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Guys,

I have uploaded a table on development. Please let me know if it is alright. Rahul also said that he will definitely work on development and put up his text tonight including an introduction to the page. So things are coming along and after a phone converstaion with Rahul we started on development and the rest of the project on a clean slate. He promised to upload a lot of good content by the end of today. Now Meedo we are still waiting for your input.Please advise asap. --Tahmina Lata 18:52, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Development of the lip occurs during face development between weeks four and five. During this time the components that contribute to the face morphology come together and are fused to form a complete upper lip. These components include the maxillary processes and the medial and lateral nasal processes [22] At Carnegie stage 15 the medial and nasal processes have started to fuse and the maxillary process lie inferior to them. During stage 16 the maxillary process and the medial nasal processes come in contact with each other and begin to fuse. Stage 18 is the later stage of lip formation. The maxillary process continue to grow and in doing so the force the medial nasal processes medialfrontally. It is between Stages 16 and 18 that a cleft lip is formed, after failure of the processes to fuse completely [23]

Normal palate shelf and key stages of mouse palatal development.jpg

Development of the palate occurs between the seventh and tenth weeks. There are two main stages in palate development, primary and secondary. During the seventh week of development the intermaxillary processes are formed. These processes give rise to the primary palate. This primary palate contributes to the floor of the nasal cavity. Towards the end of the seventh week the palatine shelves, which were lying parallel to the tongue, start to move into a more horizontal position above the tongue. These palatine shelves begin to fuse with each other and with the primary palate. Fusion is complete by week ten and the secondary palate is formed. It is between weeks seven and ten of development that a cleft palate is formed as a cleft palate is the result of the palatine shelves failing to fuse properly. [24]

(placeholder for animation)

The palate and the lips are develop from 3 of the 5 prominences that surround the stomodeum of the fetus: the frontonasal prominence, the right maxillary prominence and the left maxillary prominence.

At stage 14 of the Carnegie staging system, the surface ectoderm of the ventrolateral part of the frontonasal prominence undergoes thickening to form the nasal placodes. The remaining portions of the frontonasal processes then grow and bulge around these placodes to form the nasal pits and the nasal processes. The mesenchyme of the maxillary process continues to grow, pushing the nasal pits medially. The upper lip consists of the maxillary processes and both the medial and lateral nasal processes- which have commenced fusion.

At stage 15- the maxillary and medial nasal processes undergo rapi growth and push the lateral nasal processes rostrally. The medial nasal process and the maxillary process also undergo fusion distally.


Timeline indicating Cleft Lip & Development

Meedo and Rahul,

Both of you have not uploaded your completed sections throughout the semester and again until today. The deadline set as a team was yesterday and you have failed to deliver your promised sections. As a result we are moving(into the discussion page) what you have contributed so far as they are incomplete and have reallocated the work between Fleur, Beth and me(as per discussion with both Fluer and Beth. We are not able to allow you more time as the overall page impacts our results and we would like to start working on these sections now as there are a few entirely new sections to work on: pathophysiology, development, genetic configuration and introduction. We would need a bit of time to complete these sections so we must start now. If you have concerns in regards to this please feel free to contact Dr Hill as he is aware of our decision.--Tahmina Lata 17:33, 8 October 2011 (EST)

oh, and one more thing. all the research i have thus far essentially points to the direction that normal development is over all these stages. and clefting can happen when there's an irregularity over anytime during this development stage. and so that's the approach the development section is going to adopt. we'll be highlighting the normal development of the upper lip and palate. and state that clefting could be initiated when there're problems encountered at any point in this stage.

also, i'm considering removing the original image under development, intending to replace it with the gif image currently being constructed. for those of you who dont know- the gif is a mini movie of sorts- composed of 4 pictures being looped to indicate development of sorts. i reckon it better enforces understanding of the process than the current image there. anyone familiar with the process of how to remove an image? if i'm not wrong- we have to contact Dr Mark to have it done.

--Rahul Mohan 17:11, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Dear Tahmina: Pertaining to your concerns regarding the deviation of the timeline- it still is very much following the initial plans. the time line is horizontal, instead of veertical, and addresses, days, weeks and the different carnegie stages. The only change that's happened is that instead of there being images distributed randomly along the timeline- there are none. instead, meedo and i are working on a gif image to address the development process. the earlier sections on development will be removed as soon as the image has been uploaded the the text for development, consolidated. that's currently being worked on. i'm certain that after we're done with development- the process will be easier to understand. as to the timeline not being clear enough- perhaps that's because its not yet completed? i advise you give me some more time. work is being done, i guarantee. and a rush job will not help further any of our causes.

as to the section on future research- i'll be commencing that later tonight. i want to get the development process sorted out a bit. there's a bit of confusion because over the entirety of the page- we ourselves have been utilising different time frames for the process. its surprising that no reader had picked it up yet, so i'm trying to consolidate all of that info and have a single message through out the wiki- instead of multiple conflicting information. glossary will be updated as soon as development work ends.

hope you're all having a good weekend. great job so far. the best is yet to be.

--Rahul Mohan 17:05, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Team,

I have uploaded the links section towards the end of the page.

--Tahmina Lata 16:19, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Tahmina-I've emailed you my number.

Boys-how are you going with the progress of your sections? Do you have alot more research to do or just uploading? Let us know if you need a hand.

Beth-If you can, I think it would be good to expand a little on the types table so it looks a bit more full. Only another 1-2 sentences per section would make a huge difference. If not, its looking good how it is. And a good start on the glossary :)

--Fleur McGregor 16:08, 8 October 2011 (EST)


Hi Fluer,

Could you please give me your phone no?--Tahmina Lata 13:15, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Team,

I have now uploaded

  • Epidemiology
  • Added more words to the glossary

Beth: good work with the glossary so far

Meedo: please proofread and edit your sections-pathophysiology and genetic configuration. There are sentences that do not make sense and has texts like Drawing in between. I know you are uploadidng diagrams however please be mindful of not leaving the unnecessary words there.

It is great that the permission is there however I still cannot see much uploading on the page.

We are also waiting for an intro picture as per our class discussion. Please update asap so we then have enough time to do something.

Rahul: I am hoping that you have more discussion o upload in development as it is not looking very organized. I personally do not think that the timeline is clear enough and to be put on the page it needs to look clear and have associated discussion as to what it is showing.

In our initial discussion you and Meedo were supposed to work from a very different timeline which was on the screen while we were discussing. You were telling Beth the plan as to how you were going to send the images to Meedo to draw and how you will design a similar timeline to the one we saw on screen that day. The plan has completely deviated from that and I am not sure why. No one has run it by the rest of the team.

You are still to upload to recent research findings, please advise progress on this.

Fluer:

I will try to upload the picture you sent for complications.

Everyone please put words in the glossary as you go and proofread grammar, spelling, layout etc as agreed in class.--Tahmina Lata 13:15, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys,

Ive amended the treatment section. Is there anything else that you think I should add? Does it look complete? I also just added some words to the glossary. Working on getting those definitions up today. Going to leave the intro til tomorrow so I can get a better idea of our overall project to give the boys a chance to upload their sections. Its looking really good! Just a bit of hard work to get it up to scratch in the next fews days & it'll be awesome! Not long to go now...

--Fleur McGregor 13:05, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys

I've put up the words i'm going to put in the glossary, i'll have to do the actual definitions later cause i gotta run to work but if there are words i've missed or words you dont think need to be there just let me know.

--Elizabeth Wren 09:32, 8 October 2011 (EST)

Hey team,

I have finished the drawings- my connection is a little slow. I will guarantee the uploading by tomorrow.

I have passed three of the drawings to Rahul since we were working together.

Also, I got the permission for the ultrasound images. All of them will be on the page :)

Cheers. --Maqdad Al Saif 21:00, 7 October 2011 (EST)


these articles any good for epidemiology?

Cervenka J, Shapiro BL (February 1970). "Cleft uvula in Chippewa Indians: prevalence and genetics". Hum. Biol. 42 (1): 47–52. PMID 5445084.

Rivron RP (March 1989). "Bifid uvula: prevalence and association in otitis media with effusion in children admitted for routine otolaryngological operations". J Laryngol Otol 103 (3): 249–52. PMID 2784825.

has some specific country stats as we spoke about tahmina...

--Fleur McGregor 18:17, 7 October 2011 (EST)

tahmina, this would be a good photo to put in complications section. its a picture of the haberman feeder used for cleft palate kids. i tried to upload it but not sure how :S

http://smilesforkids.missouri.edu/for_parents/feeding.php

--Fleur McGregor 18:12, 7 October 2011 (EST)

hey guys,

here is a great link below that may be a good external link to put on our page? also, may have some info that is handy.

http://smilesforkids.missouri.edu/common_conditions/clp.php#treatment_clp

--Fleur McGregor 18:02, 7 October 2011 (EST)

meedo- http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/clinical/departments/pediatrics/clinical-services/tutorials/cleft/development could you get me a drawing of all 3 photos? i've sent them to your email. i'll be combining them into a gif animation for development. thanks! --Rahul Mohan 16:41, 7 October 2011 (EST)

hey guys- i'll be putting up more of the explanations for development by mid day today. really need to get some sleep now. its slightly disorganised now, so i'm trying to sort the information out to pick out what's relevant to our topic. check back later. --Rahul Mohan 03:34, 7 October 2011 (EST) hey Tahmina- care to send me the file so that i can attempt to upload it? --Rahul Mohan 02:37, 7 October 2011 (EST)

Guys I am having trouble uploading the file for treatment http://php.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=File:Line_diagram_showing_Bardach_two-flap_technique_of_palatoplasty_in_a_bilateral_cleft_lip_and_palate.jpg Maybe one of you can try? --Tahmina Lata 19:17, 6 October 2011 (EST)


meedo- i reckon this should be the top photo: http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTQMlnYM5-zTdZ0Bx0FmhjfRCj5bYFeYenjQ2nPL6QyaSol0xsD and perhaps this would be a a good pic to have as well- it indicates both unilateral and bilateral cleft lips: http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRPgl-H4mF1R3BYa-obqh17VaDm4NibnAKi73AXz5XW_EMvuWclPA --Rahul Mohan 19:02, 6 October 2011 (EST)

Page Edits 30 Sep

Meedo, Here is the radiology image link http://radiology.rsna.org/content/217/1/236.long --Tahmina Lata 18:51, 6 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys,

Heres a pic of a before and after repair. Let me know if you want a different picture.

Image shows a child before and after surgery to repair a bilateral cleft lip

--Elizabeth Wren 14:07, 6 October 2011 (EST)

Fleur-Intro, Aetiology, Glossary & treatment

Tahmina-Epidemiology, Recent Research, Glossary

Meedo-Introduction drawing, add drawing in pathophysiology, Genetic Configuration(expand text) & drawing, Ultrasound picture for diagnosis

Beth-Intro picture, glossary in general

Rahul-Development, pictures, & two recent research paper

Everyone will also look at proofreading with the assesment criteria in mind.--Tahmina Lata 13:31, 6 October 2011 (EST)

Hey People,

Just fixed the reference 47. Be aware that reference 52 is empty.

Also, another reminder, we need to make links to embryology pages if we mention any of their content on our page :)

Tahmina, Could you post the link for the Ultrasound images again? I will re-contact them.

Cheers

Corrected references:

Agrawal K. Cleft palate repair and variations. Indian J Plast Surg. 2009 Oct;42 Suppl:S102-9. PubMed PMID: 19884664; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2825076

Furlow LT Jr. Cleft palate repair by double opposing Z-plasty. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1986 Dec;78(6):724-38. PubMed PMID: 3786527.

Markus AF, Smith WP, Delaire J. Primary closure of cleft palate: a functional approach. Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1993 Apr;31(2):71-7. PubMed PMID: 8471583.

Poswillo D. The aetiology and surgery of cleft palate with micrognathia. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 1968 Aug;43(2):61-88. PubMed PMID: 5673878; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2312243.

Wallace AF. A history of the repair of cleft lip and palate in Britain before World War II. Ann Plast Surg. 1987 Sep;19(3):266-75. PubMed PMID: 3310812.

Wong FK, Hagg U. An update on the aetiology of orofacial clefts. Hong Kong Med J. 2004 Oct;10(5):331-6. Review. PubMed PMID: 15479962.

Katzel EB, Basile P, Koltz PF, Marcus JR, Girotto JA. Current surgical practices in cleft care: cleft palate repair techniques and postoperative care. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2009 Sep;124(3):899-906. PubMed PMID: 19730310.

Fleur --Fleur McGregor 12:22, 6 October 2011 (EST)


Hi Team,

WEll,

I've seen many changes on the page... I have to say fantastic work on the tables and new information added.

I'm still working on the 2 sections to make it more readable and pretty.

About the ultrasound images, I haven't heard from RNSA, but I believe they will send us soon.

I've emailed them twice. just in case, we should look into other images if they are late in response.

Cheers. --z3284061 11:46, 6 October 2011 (EST)


Agrawal, K. (2009). Cleft palate repair and variations. Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery , 102-109.

Bardach, J. (1995). Two flap palatoplasty; Bardach's technique. Operative techniques Plastic Surgery , 211–214.

Furlow, L. (1986). Jr Cleft palate repair by double opposing Z-plasty. Plastic Reconstruction Surgery , 724-738.

Markus AF, S. W. (1993). Primary closure of cleft palate: a functional approach. Br J Oral Maxillofacial Surgery , 71-77.

Poswillo, D. (1968). The Aetiology and Surgery of Cleft Palate with Micrognathia. Royal College of Surgeons of England .

Wallace, A. (1987). A history of the repair of cleft lip and palate in Britain before World War II. Ann Plast Surg , 19:266–75.

Wong FK, H. U. (2004). An update on the aetiology of orofacial clefts. Hong Kong Medical Journal , 331-336.

Tahmina here are the references. Will give you specifics when i see you.

Fleur --Fleur McGregor 11:17, 6 October 2011 (EST)

Awesome work Tahmina! I've added some more stuff to Types but I was wondering whats happening with Development. Are we still changing it? If not, I'll add some more info to that too. Beth --z3292953 10:58, 6 October 2011 (EST)

Team,

The table has been uploaded under treatment, we will fix the references once I receive them.

--Tahmina Lata 22:05, 5 October 2011 (EST)

Hi Beth,

It is due on the 1oth Oct. --Tahmina Lata 17:56, 5 October 2011 (EST)


Hey guys,

The page is looking good. I've just uploaded a table for the Types section and I'm working on adding some more info. Do we know the final due date?

Beth --Elizabeth Wren 15:12, 5 October 2011 (EST)

Hi Fluer,

Thank you for restructuring the page. It does look better. If you have stuff for treatment please send them to me and I will upload them. Also maybe we can look into getting permission for the animations. Are you able to work on the expanding the epidemiology and the introduction if you got time?

Cheers --Tahmina Lata 13:57, 5 October 2011 (EST)

Hey guys,

I found this cool link which has a few short animations of palate development. I think they are copyrighted but would it be worth posting the link?

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1280866-overview

check it out and let me know what you think.

Fleur


Hey Tahmina,

I have been emailing as well but have not received any of your emails nor an email from anyone else?? Perhaps you are using the one which has a mistake in the address? It should be z3308965@student.unsw.edu.au. I have worked on the treatment page as discussed but am having trouble uploading a table. I will email it to you today and also bring a copy to class tomorrow in hopes to get it up. I hope you all dont mind that I have restructured the page a little for better flow and am working on a few general things today.

Is there anything else specifically you want me to work on?

Fleur


Team,

I didn't receive an any reply from any of you yet. Jut posting the email I sent to you last week in the discussion page-hoping that you might check the page before Thursday and give me some directions.

Thank you


From: Tahmina [1] Sent: Friday, 30 September 2011 6:16 PM To: 'Maqdadi inspirer'; 'bethwren@hotmail.com'; 'z3272325@student.unsw.edu.au'; 'z3308965@unsw.student.edu.au' Subject: RE: ANAT2341Group

Hi Rahul,

Can you let me know if you are working on the introduction?

Also Fleur, can you please advise if you are expanding on the treatment section as we discussed a few weeks ago?

I just want to know so I can look at working on these sections if you guys aren’t.

Thank you


Guys,

I have fixed up all the double references. As per Dr Hill's comments we have some ultrasound pictures that I am waiting for the permission to reuse, Meedo can you please let me know if you have them yet? I will also upload epidemiology soon.--Tahmina Lata 19:52, 2 October 2011 (EST)


Just posting some current research links that you might find useful:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21950533

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21948644

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21939127

--Tahmina Lata 17:23, 30 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11 Review

  • The intro is not an introduction. I suggest reading other pages to get an idea of what to write. What you have put in belongs in the epidemiology I think?
  • Timeline – doesn’t need its own headings, perhaps put in a table like other groups, it looks quite good that way.
  • In Diagnosis, you make a point of how you have to prepare the parents psychologically for the birth of their funny-looking baby – why is this such a big issue? I mean, yes, nobody wants a deformed (for want of a better word) baby, but you make a big deal of it and it is not clear why.
  • Developmental staging – reconsider the formatting/placement of text and pictures in this section.
  • Types of cleft lip/palate – you repeat in a paragraph what you have mentioned in dot points. Choose one and stick with that.
  • Genetic configuration section seems incomplete, may be better to have this section nearer the top. You also need to explain better the different genes/how they affect/what their mutation is.
  • Treatment – you just have a list of things, and have not explained any of them. You really need to do this, and put most of the terms in the glossary.
  • Current and future research has a lot to do, as well as the glossary.
  • Overall, you have a good start, but there is a lot of research and writing left to do. Make sure you explain the different concepts well, or at least put a definition in the glossary.

--z3332824 14:52, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Peer Review

  • No references in the Introduction. All the information presented in this section is in keeping with an Epidemiology section, NOT an introduction.
  • History is very enjoyable to read, but it leaves the development of an understanding of the specific mechanisms of the disease entirely to the timeline. Perhaps try link the two more? The picture in the timeline is impressively made relevant by the legend below it.
  • Very good presentation of diagnosis, outlining the limitations of diagnostic techniques. Very good use of tables to elucidate the specifics of the techniques.
  • Syndromes and Anomalies etc. “text will be added soon”. Really? Could possibly use more references, but the text itself is very in-depth.
  • Development needs references, but the information presented covers a broad scope. Inventive use of picture alignment.
  • Inclusion of the section Types of Cleft Palate/Lip as an independent body is a rather good idea, but it may perhaps be better placed closer to the start of the page.
  • Pathophysiology: “DRAWING!!! To be added soon,” these things really need to be cleaned up. The section as a whole needs more references. The section could also benefit from the inclusion of pictures.
  • Genetic Configuration needs references, and could be cleaned up in terms of layout.
  • Neuroembryology and Functional etc is very detailed and well explained, with good use of pictures. However, it seems like a lot of what’s stated there has already been stated in other sections.
  • Treatment needs references. Very good use of pictures, however.
  • Problems Associated etc could probably do better with actual text rather than bullet-points. Also, references.
  • Current/Future Research is very strangely set up. Needs more explanation of the directions of research.
  • REFERENCES.

--z3290689 14:47, 29 September 2011 (EST)


Peer Assessment

  • Introduction:way too brief. Needs more information. Include an image to make it look more appealing e.g. child with the characteristic appearance of the condition.
  • History and timeline should be under one section, not be separated into two. The timeline is well written and great job extending it up to 2010, but try and summarize it a bit more so that the key events and figures stand out more. The image of Pierre Joseph Desault breaks up the information well and makes the section look more appealing.
  • The diagnosis section is well researched, written and laid out. However try and include an image or flowchart to break up the paragraphs. Good use of the tables to present the figures. I suggest this section be moved further down the page and place sections such as aetiology, pathogenesis, features above this. The information does not flow well from timeline straight to diagnosis.
  • The epidemiology should have it's own section. It seems a bit out of place in the diagnosis section and it also needs to be expanded a bit more.
  • "Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft section" is well written. The images nicely breaks up the information. Be careful of the making certain words appear in bold, it doesn't make much sense e.g. why is the word "rare" in bold? Also the layout of this section needs to be corrected, some sentences are double spaced while others are not.
  • Pathophysiology section needs an image to break up the last three lengthy paragraphs.
  • Genetic configuration section also requires an image. Very text heavy. The womb and external environment sections need to be more clear.
  • The "Neuroembryology and functional anatomy" section is well paid out. The image needs to be properly referenced. Not sure if it from another source or a student drawn image.
  • There are no student drawn images??
  • The treatment section is well written but try and edit the layout a bit so it looks much neater.
  • Current and future research section needs more information.
  • Glossary: needs to be expanded more.

--Z3291622 11:32, 29 September 2011 (EST)


GROUP 11: Cleft Palate and Lip

  • Introduction i feel needs more content, too short. more referencing is needed
  • History could be better formatted in a table
  • diagnosis is well researched , good use of tables
  • Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft section needs to be completed, good information so far, however conditions could be described more
  • Development has good info but really needs more referencing
  • I feel more description is needed for Types of Cleft Palate/Lip
  • Current and Future Research should be explained more
  • Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts has very detailed and informative info


Overall:

  • ok balance between text and images
  • headings could be better placed
  • some images could be better placed so text isn't disrupted
  • glossary needs to be finished, and you could improve this by linking the glossary term

--z3331556 11:05, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Peer Review

This wiki has come a long way from when Mark Hill originally evaluated it, so well done for everyone for putting the input in such a short amount of time. Still, this is very incomplete. Cleft palate sounds like a very interesting subject, yet I'm left a little dazed and lost a little interest by the end.

  • Headings are all over the place. Aetiology could of used it's own heading instead of Development.
  • Introduction is lacking in a lot of detail, needs to be expanded.
  • Introduction has no references.
  • Images are not referenced properly. No use of the pubmed reference seen.
  • Could use more pictures. If it was hard finding pictures, you should of done some drawings.
  • Timeline would of benefited into a table as it wouldn't have to be so stretched out. Does not need it's own heading.
  • No epidemiology. What is the incidence rate? Among gender, race, age?
  • No student drawn images.
  • No references in Genetic Configuration.
  • No references in Treatment.
  • No references in Problems associated with Cleft Palate
  • No references in Treatment.
  • Treatment could of expanded into Management as there wold be a lot of difficulty in everyday activity regarding this abnormality.
  • Current and Future Research is lacing in detail.
  • Glossary needs more work.
  • I don't understand the Gallery section. Could of used those pictures in the Introduction.


--z3293267 10:55, 29 September 2011 (EST)


Cleft Palate and Lip (Group 11) Peer Review:

Introduction: Too brief. Elaborate further. Image would make it more interesting too.

History/ Timeline: Could you combine these two together? They seem relevant together. The image in timeline lacks a student template and proper referencing format. Otherwise, timeline is extensive which is good to see.

Diagnosis: Should this section appear so early into the page? Great use of tables to break up the text. Try inserting some images into this section if possible.

“Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft” – the subheading in itself seems incomplete. This section is impressive. Images are great! Some lack student templates. Some bullet points could be further explained.

Development: Aetiology section has no references. This section needs to be described further. Image lacks a label at the bottom and seems mal-aligned.

Types of Cleft Palate/Lip: Bullet points could be better explained. Good use of images, however they lack some information such as the student template. Second image of this section is slightly too small as a thumbnail and pierces into the section below.

Pathophysiology: Good use of tables, however they seem too brief. Lack of references. “DRAWING!!! To be added soon.” – good idea. Information needs to be better organized. Genetic Configuration: An image would be good to break up the large slap of text. References are missing.

Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts: Image lacks proper referencing format and student template. Information is extensive which is good, however once again try spacing it out more and organizing it better.

Treatment: Drawings are good with the relevant information, however the one on the left hand side seems slightly out of place. The bullet points are very brief.

Problems associated with Cleft Palate: No references. Needs to be elaborated. An image would work well in this section to help visualise some of the problems.

Current and Future Research: I am sure you know that this section needs much more work.

Glossary: Needs more terms.

Gallery: Good idea but seems incomplete.

A good effort so far!--z3290808 10:53, 29 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11 Assessment

  • The intro is not an introduction. I suggest reading other pages to get an idea of what to write. What you have put in belongs in the epidemiology I think?
  • Timeline – doesn’t need its own headings, perhaps put in a table like other groups, it looks quite good that way.
  • In Diagnosis, you make a point of how you have to prepare the parents psychologically for the birth of their funny-looking baby – why is this such a big issue? I mean, yes, nobody wants a deformed (for want of a better word) baby, but you make a big deal of it and it is not clear why.
  • Developmental staging – reconsider the formatting/placement of text and pictures in this section.
  • Types of cleft lip/palate – you repeat in a paragraph what you have mentioned in dot points. Choose one and stick with that.
  • Genetic configuration section seems incomplete, may be better to have this section nearer the top. You also need to explain better the different genes/how they affect/what their mutation is.
  • Treatment – you just have a list of things, and have not explained any of them. You really need to do this, and put most of the terms in the glossary.
  • Current and future research has a lot to do, as well as the glossary.
  • Overall, you have a good start, but there is a lot of research and writing left to do. Make sure you explain the different concepts well, or at least put a definition in the glossary.
  • References - some are doubled up/several of the same one after the other, they have to be condensed. Look at other group's pages on how to do this (I am not sure myself)

--z3332824 10:47, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Intro is extremely short and brief, but that’s fine.

History and timeline should probably be made into one timeline of the history of cleft lip/palate.

The balance of pictures, tables and texts if poor but all aspects are there in the appropriate amount. More pictures preferable and placement hasn’t been thought out well esp. the schematic diagrams under treatment. Lists in associated problems should probably be a table.

Inconsistent amounts of references in each section. Some have none, others have sufficient referencing. And history, perhaps a little too much. Also duplication of references.

Current and future research is poorly done.

z3332178 =]


Peer Review

Some places for improvement.

  • Double spacing of paragraphs looks awkward.
  • History section would benefit by placing the information into a timeline rather than paragraphs as it is a bit hard to follow. Having both a history section and a timeline section makes no sense.
  • Syndromes and anomalies has sections where “text will be added soon”. Definitely needs more information.Symptoms need to be explained instead of just listed.
  • Needs more images, lots of large blocks of text. And images need to be formatted into the text as formatting currently looks awkward. Text needs to be grammatically corrected and formatted into paragraphs.
  • Further Research could be added, for example papers or groups that are researching as currently it is just being referred to. Listing the name of a paper isn’t discussing it.
  • Glossary could be expanded.
  • Where are the references? Where did you get this information from? Large blocks of text without references. References need to be fixed. There are many that are just a web address. Full citation is needed. Double ups need to be fixed. Links to pubmed could be good. Also perhaps research from MORE sources is necessary as there is only a few when you cut out the double references.

--z3217043 10:08, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Peer review of Group Project 11

Please include your reviews below this section, and nowhere else in this discussion. This is to facilitate easy reference later. Thank you.


Group 11

Hey, this is a interesting disease, with some good images to show the disease clearly.

  1. The key points relating to the topic that your group allocated are clearly described.
    • Introduction: very rushed, no reference and needs much more work, it should be a succinct summary of this whole page.
    • History: Has interesting content, though timeline would be better incorporated under History, not a section of its own
    • Diagnosis: If you're abbreviating Cleft Palate to CLP, you should have it as Cleft palate (CLP). The two given tables are pretty much the same, except for different sample number. Is it really necessary to have the two tables when they're so similar? Could do well with an image
    • Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft: Nice array of images used here. Content is good (for ones you provided), but needs work on referencing. Perhaps you could organise the content into a table for easy comparison since you have more than one anomalies
    • Aetiology: Needs referencing, image could have a caption to explain it. Although the content is there, it's too brief and I feel it could be organised in a more effective manner, such as using number stages.
    • Types of Cleft Palate/Lip:very brief, please explain the points (ie. what's the differences between them? you say there are differences in severity, how so?)
    • Pathophysiology: need to reformat table more effectively and work on referencing
  2. The choice of content, headings and sub-headings, diagrams, tables, graphs show a good understanding of the topic area.
    • need to balance out the text with images, could organise page better with more subheadings
  3. Content is correctly cited and referenced.
    • needs to work on referencing!!
  4. The wiki has an element of teaching at a peer level using the student's own innovative diagrams, tables or figures and/or using interesting examples or explanations.
    • NO self drawn images so far
  5. Evidence of significant research relating to basic and applied sciences that goes beyond the formal teaching activities.
    • much more research needs to be done. sections overall are lacking substance and doesn't explain the content very well
  6. Relates the topic and content of the Wiki entry to learning aims of embryology.
  7. Clearly reflects on editing/feedback from group peers and articulates how the Wiki could be improved (or not) based on peer comments/feedback. Demonstrates an ability to review own work when criticised in an open edited wiki format. Reflects on what was learned from the process of editing a peer's wiki.
  8. Evaluates own performance and that of group peers to give a rounded summary of this wiki process in terms of group effort and achievement.
  9. The content of the wiki should demonstrate to the reader that your group has researched adequately on this topic and covered the key areas necessary to inform your peers in their learning.
  10. Develops and edits the wiki entries in accordance with the above guidelines

"What would improve this project...."

  • referencing
  • more images
  • glossary; lacking a lot of terms
  • needs much more research

--z3291643 10:53, 29 September 2011 (EST)



Cleft Palate and Lip – Group 11

  • Introduction very brief. No use of referencing or image included. This could be improved greatly.
  • History is great and well covered, thought this could be included in one section though rather than breaking it up for the timeline.
  • Diagnosis is well done. Really like the tables. Maybe an image in this section could improve it.
  • Good use of images in Syndromes and Anomalies. Maybe a table could improve the flow of writing? Seems quite broken up with all the dot points.
  • Development/Aetiology section seems to lack referencing. Is this information reliable? Where was it collected?
  • Some formatting issues in the next section “Types” with the images and headings. Thought a table could present this information well also
  • Pathophysiology is excellent, however again seems to be missing some references.
  • Genetic Configuration and Neuro Embryology very well done. Excellent images in Neuro, maybe an image included in the genetic configuration?
  • Some formatting issues in the treatment section with the images. I thought that a more detailed description of these images would be good. Aswell as there being NO references. Where did this info come from? This is the same for the next section ”problems associated”. No referencing at all. This needs to be fixed otherwise you may get done for plagiarism.
  • Current and future research section needs completing. A comment on the general direction of future research and the aims of current research is important. More detail required not just listing of papers. Image could also be included in this section.
  • Glossary incomplete.
  • Some issues with referencing such as multiple entries appearing for same paper, and some sites note referenced correctly.

--Z3288196 10:50, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11

  • Introduction – could use some referencing, an image if possible, and a brief introduction to the other sections of the page.
  • History could go with Timeline as they are both related, the timeline could also be put into a table, but it’s fine the way it is (Y)
  • Diagnosis is a well researched section, some great information here.
  • Image under developmental staging could use a legend and could be formatted to add to the continuity of the page.
  • ‘Types of Cleft Palate/Lip’ – dot points need to be fixed up, unilateral and bilateral should be formatted to the left, and dot points should follow under each sub-heading as per normal, an easy fix.
  • Pathophysiology – ummm... “DRAWING!!! To be added soon.”....some references missing here.
  • Genetic configuration – could include a student drawn image of the genes involved.
  • Treatment – needs to be formatted better in order for it to be read easily.
  • Current and future research needs more detail, glossary also needs a lot more entries.

--z3331469 08:37, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11:

  • Intro: Didn’t find it to be a fantastic read, could use an image and you also need to briefly expand on the other sections of the page very briefly.
  • History/timeline: These sections should be combined. Perhaps don’t use double spacing between your dot points, as it’s making it look longer than it is. But some very interesting points.
  • Diagnosis: Would be best to place the diagnosis after aetiology/pathophysiology, just a suggestion. Some excellent information nonetheless. The use of colour is great to see.
  • Development: Aetiology should have its own section and the details provided need to elaborated upon. Use an image of the gene perhaps.
  • Types of cleft-palate: image is very interesting and detailed.
  • Pathophysiology: Good use of colour. “DRAWING!!! To be added soon” nice to know that you’re enthusiastic about this drawing, but probably best if you didn't write this.
  • Genetic configuration: There’s no references here. This could be a subheading rather than a section on its own.
  • Treatment: references missing and need to elaborate on the dot-points.
  • Glossary: incomplete
  • Overall, the structure is poorly formatted. There are headings that should be sub headings and there are subheadings that should headings (eg: aetiology). References are missing, glossary is incomplete and some images are poorly referenced/copyrighted. In saying that, there was some excellent research but it just needs to be reorganised and tidied up. Good work so far.

--z3290270 02:12, 29 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11: Cleft Palate/Lip

  • Introduction: That is not an introduction, much more info needed, please expand.
  • History & Timeline: Definitely combine these two sections. Put the timeline into a table would be nice, this would help remove all that spacing. The History section is pretty okay, maybe an image?
  • Diagnosis: Very well done! Big improvement compared to the initial sections. There is a lot of content, but not overly so. The layout of the images and tables are well done. However, there are some minor punctuation errors, like missing fullstops, but other than that, well summarised!
  • Development: Needs to have more info. Aetiology section is done well, but where are the references! Developmental Staging section seems to be targeting a specific audience, maybe “dumb” it down a little for the rest to understand better.
  • Pathophysiology: All the content seems to be there, just need a few images and maybe subheadings to make that block of text into something more appealing to read.
  • Genetic Configuration: No references in this section! There should be a way to also clean up the layout and spacing, of 1) Womb environment and 2) External environment sub-part.
  • Neuroembryology: No faults here, good job.
  • Treatment: Plenty dot points, but no explanation, seems empty. Need references.
  • Problems: Same as treatment, need more explanation per dot point, as well as references.
  • Current and Future Research: Obviously needs much more info.
  • Glossary: Getting there, many more words are required here.

--z3332327 01:29, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Peer review:

  • brief introduction with not much development on other sections than epidemiology, please write more!
  • history and timeline sections could be combined together? and also i think the timeline section could be a bit more brief, its just to give a bit of insight really.
  • how about you rearrange the headings and put diagnosis after aetiology and pathophysiology.
  • elaborate more on the verbose words in Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft e.g popliteal web and Velocardiofacial
  • development section needs text, also some parts of aetiology could be elaborated e.,g indirect genetic factors
  • formatting of pictures in between the sections needs to be worked on.
  • Genetic section is good but it needs some pictures of the genes.

Treatment needs to be explained a bit more, adding text to pictures doesn't really help to understand what is happening.

  • current and future research could be expanded.
  • very small glossary
  • multiple references and also no PMID links?

--Jasjit Walia 00:34, 29 September 2011 (EST)


Peer Review for Group 11

  • The introduction is nowhere near interesting. Very short and needs to be expanded severely.
  • History section provides interesting information in regards to ancient history, however there should be more contemporary history that shoul be explained in this section as it would make it better.
  • Timeline is well constructed, well done.
  • Information found in the diagnosis should be placed further down under aetiology and pathogenesis as it would make the flow of the page much better. However the information it has is well written
  • Aswell the information in ‘Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft’ should be placed under etiology and pathogenesis. Information is informative and good use of pics with the text
  • No work under development, either include information or totally remove it.
  • First part of aetiology is not referenced at all. Please include references to support the information being presented.
  • Image in the developmental staging section should have a caption to tell the reader what they are observing. Also it should be placed in a better position as it seems to overlap into the next section
  • Under the types of cleft lips section, the list of the types of lips should be placed under the bottom paragraph as explaining the different types before listing the types is better to do.
  • Fix the referencing for the image with the types of cleft palates.
  • Under pathophysiology there is text which seems to be comments to the editors. Remove them when your completing your assignment
  • The two paragraphs under the tables in pathophysiology seem to have no referencing. Please include it.
  • This sentence doesnt make sense; ‘’ However, the y are known as contributors to process of prominences fusion’’
  • Possibly include some images under genetic configuration.
  • First half of the information under Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts should be placed under background information at the start of the page. It would make the page look better.
  • Current research must be expanded upon as its too short
  • Glossary must be expanded upon, needs to be updated
  • Referencing is not referenced properly as their is repetition in your referencing. Please fix.

--Z3291317 23:57, 28 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11

Introduction: The introduction needs a lot more work. More detail required.

History: The history and timeline could be collapsed into one section. It would look better without so much spacing between the paragraphs.

Diagnosis: This section is well done but needs pictures.

Etiology: This section could be expanded upon. I think it would be good if you explained how each of the developmental errors occur.

Developmental staging: You could explain what the stages are. A non-embryology student might not understand the different stages.

Types of cleft palate: The images are great and the text is good but I think this section would be better off in pathophysiology for example, not its own section.

Pathophysiology: The text is good but again, more pictures are needed to break up the text.

Genetics: This section could be explained in more detail. Pictures needed.

Anatomy: This section is well done

Treatment, problems and future directions: All of these sections look like a good start but each dot point needs to be explained in more detail.

--z3291324 23:28, 28 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11 Peer Review

  • Introduction is brief; and that's about all. Please try to write more; from what you have written here, it sounds more like an epidemiology section. The history section is slightly better although the timeline shouldn't be a new section of the page but a subheading of the history is inadequate. Also, don't double space, because there isn't enough important information here to justify the spacing.
  • The section on Diagnosis is well set out, and is discussed well. The information in the table is well explained and those images that you have obtained with regards to the syndromes and anomalies associated with the cleft are very interesting images that summarise your information well. I like the layout of this particular section!
  • Development section requires some text; the aetiology section could actually explain those indirect genetic factors with environmental factors or possibly just environmental factors. How do these come about? Also make the types of cleft palate/lip a subsection of the development or slot it into pathophysiology; where it is at the moment is in a place where it doesn't exactly belong. THe information in cleft palate/lip is quite extensive and very interesting though!
  • Still waiting for a student-drawn diagram, but this is understandable and make sure you copyright it when you do draw it!
  • Genetic configuration; try to fix your formatting a little. Some bits of the formatting just need a better layout (and don't forget to space in your nutrition and drugs sections). Consider using more ====== <-- to get new subsections, which will also help.
  • The neuroembryology section is truthfully the only section in all the projects which I have seen that relates the development back to the embryology course - well done! It is well explained and also seems to be the only section in which I actually don't mind the left-aligned image. Well done - I recommend this section stay the same! :)
  • Treatment is well laid out; however, back to the pet hate - right-align the second image here because it doesn't look correct in the way that it has been set out now. Also try to explain the surgery slightly better as opposed to just dot-point the information and hope that we understand it.
  • Problems associated with cleft palate - please try to write some more and explain as to why these problems occur due to variations from the normal morphology. eg. Speech issues due to the cleft palate because resonance cannot be achieved properly due to the continuity of the oral/nasal cavities.
  • Current and Future research needs a lot more written on it - remember, this is where the research is headed and what can be hoped from people in the future who may suffer from this disease.
  • Glossary is incomplete; references are repeated, and have you used more references than the number quoted? However, no worries about these issues as they are common across all projects.
  • Overall, a project that has mixed amounts of contributions throughout it. Please ensure the quality of the project is uniformly excellent! Have you considered using tables and graphs to get some information across as well? Some sections also lack referencing; please make sure this is corrected as it is difficult to read any project without good scientific evidence.

--Leonard Tiong 22:48, 28 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11:

•Very short introduction with no references. Maybe give a greater overview of what will be talked about throughout the page.

•Good use of the picture in the timeline, but maybe this section and the history could be combined as it is quite long.

•Some of the pictures used, such as the second picture in the types of cleft palate section disrupt the formatting of the page. Also in the treatment section, the second image seems to be in the incorrect position.

•Quite a few sections lack referencing, particularly the genetic configuration and treatment sections that have no references at all. This does not provide the reader with the option to read on further or access the resources where you have collected your information from.

•Lots of references are repeated

•Overall, it seems like a lot of research has been done, though there are some formatting and referencing errors which will need to be corrected.

--z3332183 21:34, 28 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11

*The key points relating to the topic that your group allocated are clearly described. Key points are there, but content is lacking especially in the introduction.

*The choice of content, headings and sub-headings, diagrams, tables, graphs show a good understanding of the topic area. Timeline should be included under 'history' Glossary is limited. in Genetic Configuration, the part about 4 sections, number 1 and 2 are together - are they meant to be presented like this? it looks out of place when 3 and 4 have their own paragraph each. It would be nice to have a subheading for pathology of cleft lip and cleft palate to separate the two for easy location.

*Content is correctly cited and referenced. References are duplicated. no references in treatment or Problems associated with Cleft Palate. fix up reference for File:Variations of Cleft Lip or Palate.jpg, File:Bilateral Cleft Lip Variations.jpg and File:Furlow Z-plasty technique.jpg.

*The wiki has an element of teaching at a peer level using the student's own innovative diagrams, tables or figures and/or using interesting examples or explanations. File:NeuromericOrganization.jpg and File:Veau-Wardill-Kilner technique of palate repair in a unilateral cleft lip and palate.jpg needs a description.

*Evidence of significant research relating to basic and applied sciences that goes beyond the formal teaching activities. Current and future research is very limited, does not show any research that extends beyond formal teaching.

*Relates the topic and content of the Wiki entry to learning aims of embryology. Link to embryology present in identifying risks in cleft plate and lip development. Developmental staging also covers it.

*Develops and edits the wiki entries in accordance with the above guidelines. Some evidence of developing wiki page with guidelines. will help if changes are made.

--z3329495 21:29, 28 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11: Peer Assessment

  • You have picked an interesting topic, surely you can write a more engaging introduction
  • Some of you headings and subheadings need rearrangement
  • The history section is good but takes a bid too much space. May be you can compress it a bid, make it a little shorter?
  • Some of you information is double
  • The neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial cleft is interesting and well written
  • Good diagnostic section. An image would be nice
  • Some more references in the treatment and associated problems section are needed
  • You could put some more words into the glossary
  • You have some "double referencing"
  • Overall, you have an interesting page. Good work. You just need a little more formatting, referencing and fixing here and there.--z3279511 17:16, 28 September 2011 (EST)

Group 11

  • Introduction: needs more contend
  • History: the contend is ok, references are missing, include the timeline
  • Diagnosis: well done
  • Syndromes and anomalies: the contend looks fine, some parts are missing, the conditions would look better in a table
  • Development:?
  • Aetiology: looks fine, but are there references missing?
  • What staging are you talking about?
  • Types: well done
  • Pathophysiology: unfinished, otherwise good, maybe add some subheadings for more structure
  • Configuration: references missing, what is the third paragraph womb or external environment?
  • Neuroembryology: well done, nice image
  • Treatment: references missing, maybe add a detailed outline of the most frequent techniques
  • Problems: references missing
  • Research: add more contend
  • Glossary: incomplete
  • Rearrange the order of headings
  • Some images lack a copyright notice
  • Textbooks ?

--Z3387190 14:34, 28 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11

  • Introduction is way too short and should include an image
  • History would work better just in a timeline
  • I think you should rearrange your headings from here on to make your project flow in a logical way
  • Current/future research should be extended and explained
  • Glossary needs to be extended
  • I also can’t seem to find your student drawing
  • Some sections repeat some information- go through this


Comments on Group Project 11

Strengths:

  • Good use of tables especially under Diagnosis.
  • Some of the images are quite good especially on the correcting process (surgery) for cleft palate.

Weaknesses:

  • Placement of headings is not quite appropriate. It gives the page a disjointed feel to it.
  • There is a lack of use of subheadings.
  • The introduction did not give an overview of the condition.

Specific corrections:

  • Timeline should be a subheading under History section
  • Introduction should answer these questions: What is it characterised by? How does it appear on individuals with this condition? What causes it? etc. It will be good to include a picture/ cartoon of an individual with cleft palate and lip.
  • Duplication of references should be avoided.
  • Some of the references are not formatted correctly.
  • For current and future research, it will be good to give a brief synopsis (2-3 sentences) of each point so that readers can get the gist of the direction of cleft palate and lip research that it is heading towards.
  • For genetic configuration, it might be better to use subheadings to point out the 4 different types of environmental factors.
  • Do include a student-drawn image.
  • Some words that should be included in the glossary are Malocclusion, nodules etc.
  • It would be better to make use of tables under treatment.

--Z3389806 11:50, 27 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11 Peer Assessment

  • Introduction needs to be expanded a bit seems like the description of the incidence
  • History needs together with the timeline which would benefit the section, where the timeline is done properly with the image of the founder though time line better together then separated
  • Diagnosis is well done though images would benefit this section
  • Syndromes and anomalies should be expanded a bit though good linkage of the images to the rare cases *Development should be changed to aetiology instead
  • Pathophysiology needs more images though nice use of tables
  • Genetic configuration needs references to back up the evidence otherwise is just statements
  • Neurology greatly structured and well presented and has image to liven the section
  • Treatment generally well structured though ex[and more on the surgical aspect as well problems associated with cleft palate
  • Current and future research needs more information as well separation between the current and the future research.
  • Glossary needs to be expanded further and linked either to section or bolded throughout the web page.
  • References need a little tweaking with the removal of the repeats, also no other information in the sub heading textbooks

z3332250 00:01, 27 September 2011 (EST)


Group 11 Critique

  1. • Introduction is far too short and more work needs to be done
  2. • History is also very short and more information needs to be added
  3. • The timeline is quite good
  4. • Diagnosis is alright
  5. • Syndromes and anomalies associated with cleft is detailed. Good job!
  6. • Development is good. Maybe use more images
  7. • The other sections are good, up until current research. More work needs to be done here as there is not enough information
  8. • Glossary is too short
  9. • Is the gallery really needed if you have images illustrating your text?


--Robert Klein 16:38, 26 September 2011 (EST)

Cleft Palate and Lip

  • Your introduction needs to be seriously expanded. What exactly is it? Defining features? Anything?
  • 'History' could be expanded on a bit, but the timeline looks good. Try to take the spaces out between each date of the timeline, at the moment it's a bit unneccesarily long
  • 'Diagnosis' would fit better towards the end of the page closer to treatment. It is a bit hard to understand before we've even had a proper description of the disorder and clinical symptoms
  • Though the information in 'Diagnosis' is quite good, the table is also quite interesting
  • 'Syndromes and Anomalies Associated with Cleft', title should fixed up 'Associated Syndromes and Anomalies' sound better. It also needs to be finised!
  • There's not even a single reference in 'Atiology'
  • 'Developmental Staging' are you refering to Carnegie stages? If so, say so.
  • Reference!! And finish 'Pathophysiology'. You won't get the marks for just saying 'it will be done soon', think of the rest of your group
  • There is not a single reference in 'Genetic Configuruation', so where then did you get your information? This section also needs images, and a bit of formating. There isn't much consistency in the use of captial letters for 'Cleft Lip'. Either use it or don't, "seems to be related to the cause of Cleft palate and cleft lip incidence" and throughout the page aswell
  • For 'Treatment' and 'Complications' a table would be good. It is not very visually appealing as a long list. That way you can incorporate some more information as well.
  • 'Problems Associated with Cleft Palate' would be better positioned higher up in the page. How do you know what your treating if you don't even know the associated problems. Reference!
  • 'Current and Future Research' really needs to be expanded. There is no where near enough information here
  • The page is coming along, but it really needs to be finished, there are far too many gaps, and no where near enough references. Try reading multiple papers before adding information.


Group 11

  • Interesting topic with good use of pictures, you guys have a great topic with a lot of interesting areas to discuss.
  • The headings could be reorganised for example diagnosis could come after explaining in detail what cleft lips are and how they are formed embryonically.
  • The introduction should introduce the main topics that you will be discussing but only briefly like what cleft palate is.. the information in the intro would fit nicely in epidemiology. (maybe you could add this section in).
  • History section is very interesting I liked the extra research.
  • The time line takes up a lot of room maybe condense it into a table format.
  • Development?? is this a section??
  • maybe put the type of cleft lip/palate into a table with a pictures corresponding to the specific type.
  • Make sure all acronyms are in the glossary.
  • It would be nice if the colours of the tables were continuous throughout the page.
  • Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts section is very well written and enjoyable to read.
  • Treatment & Problems associated with Cleft Palate sections have no referencing. It would strengthen and give your page some authority if you cited where your information was from.
  • A little summary for your future and current research would make this section a bit more interesting rather then just using dot points.
  • Make sure your references aren't doubled.
  • Ensure your pictures are referenced correctly.
  • Furlow Z-plasty technique picture is positioned so that it interrupts the flow of reading maybe rethink the position of this picture.
  • Variations of Cleft Lip or Palate picture is great and I think it could be more of a "key " picture on your page maybe centralise it?.
  • No student drawing.
  • Gallery seems a little irrelevant.
  • More needs to be added into glossary eg. Otitis media


Group 11

  • The introduction is no where near long enough and needs an image
  • History needs to be expanded and dates made more obvious to the reader
  • Timeline- should be combined with history. So that my previous point is not needed
  • The order of your subheadings is a little confusing
  • Some sections double up the information
  • Current research needs to be completed, as do other sections
  • The glossary needs to be expanded
  • The project has started to take form but there is work to go to complete the information and format it into a more easily accessible piece of work.


  • Introduction: Too short. Also, how come there are no references? How about starting with a brief anatomical description?
  • History: No reference for the first paragraph? I like the idea of mentioning Plato, but could you then also expand a little bit more on his thoughts? Also, what was the explanation offered by Philippe Frederick Blandin?
  • Timeline: Looks good to me, though some terms should be explained in the glossary.
  • Diagnosis: I'm not sure I'd make this follow on immediately from the Timeline. I would put this section between Types of Cleft Palate/Lip & Pathophysiology, maybe? While you do talk about the technical difficulties just before the Cleft Soft Palate Detection part, but considering you start a new subsection, it's confusing to keep talking as if it was the same paragraph. Maybe say "the technical difficulties mentionned above" instead? An explanation in the glossary of what a cleft soft palate actually is, is definately needed! The Cleft Hard Palate section is very well done.
  • Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft: Looks fine.
  • Development: Under construction? or is there meant to be no text, and you're simply splitting this section into the two subsections? If yes, you might want to make that clearer.
  • Aetiology: This part is slightly technical and could do with some more detailed explanations. It doesn't feel like a coherent section.
  • Developmental Staging: Well explained.
  • Types of Cleft Palate/Lip: Looks fine. Though the "algorhythm for repair..." figure seems to be in a slightly random place..? How does it relate to this section (or the next)?
  • Pathophysiology: The cranio-facial development pathway is a very complex process. Since the several points of development at which “Clefting” might occur is based on the condition and the wide range of its phonotypical expression. Make this one sentence? You start talking about neural crest cells quite out of the blue. Has there been any mention of them before? It's quite confusing to have them added into the story without having previously told why. The first two paragraphs under the table lack references? This part repeats what has been partly said before, but adds more physiological detail to it. I'd find it more logical to combine the different aspects to give one, more complete picture.
  • Genetic configuration: Very poor language/sentence structure. Where are the references? Putting womb and external environment together does make sense, but you might want to explain in a sentence why.
  • Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts: Excellent explanation, though some terms should be explained in the glossary. Why are some words in bold? Again, this sort of repeats previous information, again with more detail from a different point of view, apparently unrelated to what's been told before, as this section doesn't follow the previous sections?
  • Treatment: Can you explain the different techniques a little bit more, instead of just having bullet points? The figures are really nice, but don't illustrate all of the techniques mentioned.
  • Problems associated with Cleft Palate: Mere list with bullet points isn't enough, more explanations needed.
  • Current and Future Research: Very poor. There must be more than 3 articles?
  • Glossary: Poor. Many more terms need explanations.
  • References: Need fixing. The same article appears lots of times in the list. Watch out with your german references... the fact that you misspell the german makes me wonder whether you could have actually read the papers? In case you're citing a reference cited within the reference you've read, there usually is a special way of doing it.
  • General: Your sections are really random and don't follow logically from one another. There is a lot of repetition of similar content in multiple different places, which is confusing. It is hard to keep an overview. Nevertheless, some of the sections are well done.


Group 11 Assessment

  • The introduction and history sections are not very long… Maybe try adding more information and some pictures.
  • The timeline should be a subheading under the history portion. Also, rather than doing a bulleted list, how about trying to format the information into a chart? This would be more aesthetically appealing.
  • For the diagnosis section, the charts look great. Referencing is completed well also. Only thing I’d suggest is to possibly add a picture.
  • For the references given throughout the wiki, there isn’t any consistency in how the [#] is given. The [#] is sometimes right after the sentence, sometimes a space is given between the sentence and citation number, and the end of the sentence (period or comma) is sometimes before or after the reference #...
  • There are several sentences throughout the wiki page which are missing punctuation at the ends of the sentences.
  • The first portion of Aetiology doesn’t have any referencing…
  • “Normal Palate Shelf…” jpg needs a sentence below it briefly describing it still.
  • The Genetic Configuration section has absolutely no referencing. Neither does the Treatment section or Problems section. Where did all this information come from?
  • Treatment and Problems would also flow better if they were placed into a chart format. Pictures could also be added.
  • The Glossary seems a bit short. Are you sure there are no other words that would be helpful if they were defined? It would also flow better if it were bullet listed.
  • Some of the references are repetitive. Make sure to fix this so they all link to a single reference instead of numerous ones of the same resource.
  • A lot of the information is repetitive as well, and things should be formatted to flow better. Also work on the referencing issues and making the overall page more aesthetically appealing.

--Z3391078 17:26, 27 September 2011 (EST)


Peer Assessment: Group Project 11

  • The introduction could definitely be expanded upon. Maybe include a short description of what cleft palate is.
  • The timeline is great - clear and informative.
  • The treatment, problems with cleft palate and genetic configuration sections are good. It might be good to move the picture in the treatment section to the right so it doesn't disturb the flow of the text. Also these sections need to have referencing added, for reliability purposes and such as if the reader wanted to know more about the findings that 'a number of drugs might be participating in creating this birth defect'.
  • Syndromes and Anomalies associated with cleft section is great and as noted there needs to be some additional text added.
  • The current and future research section could be expanded. Maybe find relevant articles, summarise their findings and see what direction is necessary to head in.
  • In the glossary writing "C" above the group of C words and so on and so forth for the rest of it, would make it easier for the reader to quickly find the desired word.
  • Under the information on all the images you have uploaded, you need to add {{Template:2011 Student Image}}.
  • Some of the references are duplicated. They can instead be linked together using the 'multiple instances on a page' editing guidelines: http://php.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=References#Multiple_Instances_on_Page.
  • Overall the project has a large amount of information and is put together reasonably well.

--z3217345 11:09, 28 September 2011 (EST)

Peer Review

  • interesting pictures
  • overall done well

--z3060621 22:02, 28 September 2011 (EST)


Peer Review

  • Introduction is way too brief and no referencing what-so-ever
  • Maybe combine the history and together.
  • Types of Cleft Palate/Lip was quite an interesting section. Although some of the images were abit too much.
  • Double referencing!
  • for treatment the layout could have been better

--z3330313 00:42, 29 September 2011 (EST)

Discussion

hey guys- keep abreast of the reviews coming in. some of them have valid points. it would be prudent to keep working on our relevant sections (without uploading it and altering the content of the wiki of course). hope you're all having a good weekend. i should be uploading the timeline later today. --Rahul Mohan 17:55, 25 September 2011 (EST)

uploaded another heading 'associated anomalies' --Tahmina Lata 10:58, 22 September 2011 (EST)

Type Comment Picture
Unilateral Cleft Palate This type of cleft refers to a cleft of the soft palate that occurs on one side of the palate. The cleft starts medially and extends laterally.
Type Unilateral Cleft Palate.jpg
Unilateral Cleft Lip This type of cleft refers to cleft of the lip that have only occurred on one side of the lip.
Unilateral cleft lip.jpg
Unilateral cleft lip with a cleft hard palate This refers to a cleft that has extended through the lip and into the hard palate. This cleft is on only one side of the lip and palate.
Unilateral cleft lip with a cleft hard palate.jpg
Unilateral cleft lip with cleft hard and soft palate This type of cleft refers to a cleft that extends through the lip, hard palate and into the soft palate. It also occurs on only one side.
Unilateral cleft lip with cleft hard and soft palate.jpg
Bilateral cleft palate This refers to a cleft of the soft palate which occurs on both sides of the palate and appears as a opening medially.
Type Bilateral cleft palate.jpg
Bilateral cleft lip This refers to a cleft of the lip that has occurred on both sides of the lip. There are many variations of this.
Bilateral cleft lip.jpg
Bilateral cleft lip with cleft hard palate This refers to a cleft of the lip and hard palate that occurs on both sides.
Bilateral cleft lip with cleft hard palate.jpg
Bilateral cleft lip with cleft hard and soft palate This refers to a cleft that has occurred on both sides of the lip and extended into both the hard and soft palates resulting in an medial opening of the soft palate.[25]
Bilateral cleft lip with cleft hard and soft palate.jpg


hey guys heres the table so far. I'm having a bit of trouble uploading the photos and finding sources for the info in the middle but I'm working on it --Elizabeth Wren 10:36, 22 September 2011 (EST)

Hey guys, just letting you know whats on the page under aetiology and treatment has not been finalised. I will need to upload images and tables. --Fleur McGregor 09:55, 22 September 2011 (EST)


Team, Found some amazing radiology images but they are under copyright. Would like to brainstorm with you all to se how we can request access. http://radiology.rsna.org/content/217/1/236.long --Tahmina Lata 00:15, 22 September 2011 (EST)

Hey Rahul, I am still working on the resolution of the image, I am considering rediesigining the orginial design and increasing the font size. Will update on it soon. I also have uploaded another brief subsection 'Problems associated with Cleft Palate'-hope it is useful. --Tahmina Lata 23:56, 21 September 2011 (EST)

Hey Guys,

I have just uploaded the Draft section Genetic Configuration... It is under review since I'm doing this with Rahul. the final version will be integrated later on. --z3284061 21:37, 21 September 2011 (EST)


Hey Rahul,

I think we should go with the Articles we have, because this is our project, yes we can have a look at the other textbooks. But in the end, remember, this is designed by us as a group! and the mdconsult website does not work! --z3284061 20:53, 21 September 2011 (EST)

Hey Meedo, pursuant to our conversation- here are the 2 links that seem to conflict.
http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Notes/face2.htm
http://www.mdconsult.com/books/page.do?eid=4-u1.0-B978-1-4160-3706-4..50012-8&isbn=978-1-4160-3706-4&uniqId=282776049-2#4-u1.0-B978-1-4160-3706-4..50012-8

and I've spotted an error in reference 40 and 41. The chapter referred to is chapter 9, not 10. The necessary changes have been made. Timeline should be up soon.

--Rahul Mohan 17:53, 21 September 2011 (EST)


Hey Rahul, I got that info from the text book but I'd probably go by what Dr Hill has. Beth --z3292953 12:20, 21 September 2011 (EST)


guys- i have a problem. in development so far- i'm trying to work on the time line for cleft lip/palate development. it so turns out that there's conflicting information everywhere. on one hand- we have (google turned this up for me) <http://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/Notes/face2.htm> which is by Dr Hill- in which its stated that "Cleft lip and palate develop between the 4th and 8th week of gestation". On the other hand- we have what's already written up for the section under dev- which has it stated that cleft lip happens from/between carnegie stage 16 and 18- and cleft palate erin week 6 to 10 (which equates roughly to carnegie stage 15 onwards. if we follow what Dr HIll's said- that would amount to stages 10-around 21. so which do we follow?


--Rahul Mohan 23:45, 20 September 2011 (EST)

Hey Tahmina- the resolution could be slightly better. have you tried saving the document as a pdf file? with maximum resolution or something? I'm not entirely certain- but i'm fairly sure it can be done. mm. on another note, guys- here're a few resources that you could check out for your relevant sections if you haven't already:

http://www.organizedwisdom.com/Cleft_Palate (scroll down to the journals section) http://www.jci.org/articles/view/22154/version/1 (particularly helpful for genetic---Meedo) http://dev.biologists.org/content/103/Supplement/41.full.pdf (helpful for development- what i'm working on right now. the last bit on genes might be useful to meedo as well.)

--Rahul Mohan 23:00, 20 September 2011 (EST)

Figure Shows How the CNS is divided to supply different structures

Guys I am parking this image here for the time being as the resolution has not come out that well and I would like some feedback from you to see if we should add this to the page.

--Tahmina Lata 20:33, 20 September 2011 (EST)

Ravichandra KS, Vijayaprasad KE, Vasa AA, Suzan S.

J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2010 Oct-Dec;28(4):311-4.

PMID: 21273723 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15479962 --Fleur McGregor 12:15, 15 September 2011 (EST)


Permission to post figure: https://s100.copyright.com/CustomerAdmin/PLF.jsp?lID=2011090_1316046741757 picture: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3086810/bin/nihms284150f2.jpg

I have also included a hand drawn hierarchical table as I could not format such table in wiki. hope it is not looking too poorly done. --Tahmina Lata 23:30, 14 September 2011 (EST)

Hi Everyone,

I have tried to stretch as much as possible and uploaded my final versions of my headings. --Tahmina Lata 23:28, 14 September 2011 (EST)


Hello People,

I have uploaded my section which is just a DRAFT. References are not all completed, and my photos are to be uploaded soon with drawings. --Maqdad Al Saif 20:35, 14 September 2011 (EST)

Guys,

As we have 5 people in our group we must have more content than other groups so I am adding a third heading 'Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial cleft.' We really need to work hard on this as the page so far is not looking the best. I hope that someone will come up with an impressive table.

--Tahmina Lata 23:03, 8 September 2011 (EST)

Hi Guys,

I will be writing about 'Diagnosis of prenatal cleft lip and palate' for my second heading. --Tahmina Lata 22:44, 6 September 2011 (EST)

Here are some more useful links with photos in them.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2562450/?tool=pubmed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC420504/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2825074/?tool=pubmed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19884685

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20694165

--Tahmina Lata 22:46, 6 September 2011 (EST)

Hello Everyone,

I have uploaded the timeline here and under the heading- 'History' I am just going to include some interesting historical facts but after researching the other heading- 'Developmental Process' it seems to coincide with developmental staging and so it might not be a good idea to have that as a broad heading. Please let me know if you have any ideas on another heading or I will come up with a different heading and research that. Let me know what you think--Tahmina Lata 22:55, 5 September 2011 EST)


Hey Guys,

Great Work finding the articles :) I noticed in the second article of Tahmina, you can use the pictures to make the content more interesting. The same goes for Fleur, the last 2 articles have great information and pictures.

let's try updating the page before the end of the weekend

Cheers Guys... --Maqdad Al Saif 16:57, 5 September 2011 (EST)


Here are the articles I am studying at this stage:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2825059/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2825068/?tool=pubmed

--Tahmina Lata 21:18, 4 September 2011 (EST)

hey guys,

I've found some pictures which we can either use in the gallery or on the front page.

about my work, it will be all updated during the break but I will share with you what I'm doing. Meedo

--z3284061 11:29, 1 September 2011 (EST)


I also found these useful

http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/assets/0/78/1067/1395/1883/1a654a12-a1b6-42cb-8a6b-9b270e322f4c.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2312243/pdf/annrcse00255-0003.pdf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2825076/

--Fleur McGregor 10:41, 1 September 2011 (EST)

Hey guys here some references I found that were kinda useful

Plast Reconstr Surg. 2011 Feb;127(2):812-21.The spectrum of median craniofacial dysplasia.Allam KA, Wan DC, Kawamoto HK, Bradley JP, Sedano HO, Saied S. PMID: 21285785

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2011 Aug;112(2):249-57. Epub 2011 Jun 12.Comparison between multislice and cone-beam computerized tomography in the volumetric assessment of cleft palate.Albuquerque MA, Gaia BF, Cavalcanti MG. PMID: 21664153

Nat Rev Genet. 2011 Mar;12(3):167-78.Cleft lip and palate: understanding genetic and environmental influences.Dixon MJ, Marazita ML, Beaty TH, Murray JC. PMID:21331089

I also found the Larsons textbook had some stuff on cleft palate and lip.

Beth --z3292953 10:20, 1 September 2011 (EST)

Hey fellas, I reckon we could have inserted a brief discussion of the etymology of the word in the introduction. I don't reckon its big enough to warrant a heading of its own. Thus, I've gone ahead and taken the liberty to remove that heading from the page. Also included an "aetiology" section under development of disease- since its looking at causation of disease. Changed current research into Current and Future Research- to increase the scope of that heading.

--Rahul Mohan 12:48, 25 August 2011 (EST)

I am doing history and developmental process.

--Tahmina Lata 10:06, 25 August 2011 (EST)

Hey Guys,

There has been some changes in our page in terms of Subheading order.

Hey Rahul, I'd be happy to share the Genetic Configuration with you... and your comments have been taken into consideration.

--z3284061 11:43, 25 August 2011 (EST)

Thankyou z3284061 for the heads up on what to do.

I've put myself down as finding current research and associated figures. However- pertaining to the latter- this would involve finding figures and diagrams relevant to our research I suppose? I'm definitely not good at art- and as for the diagrams and pics- that would be dependent more on the content we come up with. Also, as a sub-section- isn't it weird to lump all animations and figures under one subsection- isolating it away from the rest of the topic? Thus being the case, I propose that we individually keep a look out for relevant animations under our own sub-heading and I would help out anyone doing a large topic. z3284061 has indicated that that genetic configuration is a large sub heading- so I'll be happy to help with that.

See you in a couple of hours, fellas.

--z3272325 04:18, 25 August 2011 (EST)

Hey Guys,

I think after we discussed last time, I'll be doing Pathophysiology and Genetic Configuration.Hmm, I just think it will be kinda big especially for Genetic Configuration :) if you guys find anything related to it, pleaase don't hesitate to post it in the discussion.

The only one who might not have been allocated to do something specific is z3272325- I think you are meant to do The Animations and figures + Current Associated research :)

Let's Start updating the page whenever we have information :)

Cheers --z3284061 23:11, 24 August 2011 (EST)


For the groupo project I will be researching Developmental Staging and Abnormaility Classification.

--z3292953 11:21, 24 August 2011 (EST)

I am researching the following sub headings: surgical timeline and etimiology. If you all post what you are researching we can forward any information we find regarding your sub heading. --Fleur McGregor 12:16, 23 August 2011 (EST)

Here's the image I've found. --Maqdad Al Saif 13:10, 18 August 2011 (EST)

Cleft lip.jpg


completely forgot I was meant to add a picture here as well. My apologies. And the group discussion's picking up- shall be more productive henceforth. here's a pic for cleft palate.

Alt
In vitro fetal palate explant culture[26]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Philip Stanier, Gudrun E Moore Genetics of cleft lip and palate: syndromic genes contribute to the incidence of non-syndromic clefts. Hum. Mol. Genet.: 2004, 13 Spec No 1;R73-81 PMID:14722155
  2. J G Kromberg, T Jenkins Common birth defects in South African Blacks. S. Afr. Med. J.: 1982, 62(17);599-602 PMID:6750816
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 P Martínez Ten, J Pérez Pedregosa, B Santacruz, B Adiego, E Barrón, W Sepúlveda Three-dimensional ultrasound diagnosis of cleft palate: 'reverse face', 'flipped face' or 'oblique face'--which method is best? Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol: 2009, 33(4);399-406 PMID:19109803
  4. Depew MJ, Simpson CA, Morasso M, Rubenstein JL. Reassessing the Dlx code: Genetic regulation of branchial arch skeletal pattern and development. J Anat. 2007;27:501–61.
  5. Nowicki JL, Burke AC. Testing Hox genes by surgical manipulation. Dev Biol. 1999. pp. 210–238
  6. Alexandre R Vieira Association between the transforming growth factor alpha gene and nonsyndromic oral clefts: a HuGE review. Am. J. Epidemiol.: 2006, 163(9);790-810 PMID:16495466
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Min Shi, George L Wehby, Jeffrey C Murray Review on genetic variants and maternal smoking in the etiology of oral clefts and other birth defects. Birth Defects Res. C Embryo Today: 2008, 84(1);16-29 PMID:18383123
  8. Marek Dudas, Andre Nagy, Nicholas J Laping, Aristidis Moustakas, Vesa Kaartinen Tgf-beta3-induced palatal fusion is mediated by Alk-5/Smad pathway. Dev. Biol.: 2004, 266(1);96-108 PMID:14729481
  9. Y Taya, S O'Kane, M W Ferguson Pathogenesis of cleft palate in TGF-beta3 knockout mice. Development: 1999, 126(17);3869-79 PMID:10433915
  10. V D Sarapura, H L Strouth, D F Gordon, W M Wood, E C Ridgway Msx1 is present in thyrotropic cells and binds to a consensus site on the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit promoter. Mol. Endocrinol.: 1997, 11(12);1782-94 PMID:9369446
  11. P J McAlpine, T B Shows Nomenclature for human homeobox genes. Genomics: 1990, 7(3);460 PMID:1973146
  12. M J Khoury, A Weinstein, S Panny, N A Holtzman, P K Lindsay, K Farrel, M Eisenberg Maternal cigarette smoking and oral clefts: a population-based study. Am J Public Health: 1987, 77(5);623-5 PMID:3565662
  13. E L Abel Fetal alcohol syndrome: the 'American Paradox'. Alcohol Alcohol.: 1998, 33(3);195-201 PMID:9632044
  14. 14.0 14.1 Jyotsna Murthy, Lvks Bhaskar Current concepts in genetics of nonsyndromic clefts. Indian J Plast Surg: 2009, 42(1);68-81 PMID:19881024
  15. Iris A L M van Rooij, Christl Vermeij-Keers, Leo A J Kluijtmans, Marga C Ocké, Gerhard A Zielhuis, Sieneke M Goorhuis-Brouwer, Jan-Jaap van der Biezen, Anne-Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman, Régine P M Steegers-Theunissen Does the interaction between maternal folate intake and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms affect the risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate? Am. J. Epidemiol.: 2003, 157(7);583-91 PMID:12672677
  16. Jennifer M Burgoon, Jacob Selhub, Marie Nadeau, T W Sadler Investigation of the effects of folate deficiency on embryonic development through the establishment of a folate deficient mouse model. Teratology: 2002, 65(5);219-27 PMID:11967921
  17. Sullivan WG. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate in blacks: An analysis of 81 patients. Plast Reconstr Surg 1989;84;406-8
  18. Kromberg JG, Jenkins T. Common birth defects in South African Blacks. S Afr Med J 1982;62:599-602
  19. P Chaussepied, D Mornet, T E Barman, F Travers, R Kassab Alteration of the ATP hydrolysis and actin binding properties of thrombin-cut myosin subfragment 1. Biochemistry: 1986, 25(5);1141-9 PMID:2938624
  20. Michael J Dixon, Mary L Marazita, Terri H Beaty, Jeffrey C Murray Cleft lip and palate: understanding genetic and environmental influences. Nat. Rev. Genet.: 2011, 12(3);167-78 PMID:21331089
  21. W Behrens-Baumann, C D Quentin, M Vogel [Acyclovir versus trifluorothymidine in the therapy of stromal herpes keratitis]. [Acyclovir versus Trifluorthymidin in der Therapie der stromalen Herpes-Keratitis.] Klin Monbl Augenheilkd: 1986, 189(4);286-8 PMID:3100859
  22. Rulang Jiang, Jeffrey O Bush, Andrew C Lidral Development of the upper lip: morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms. Dev. Dyn.: 2006, 235(5);1152-66 PMID:16292776
  23. The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology (8th Edition) by Keith L. Moore and T.V.N Persaud - Moore & Persaud Chapter Chapter 9 The Pharyngeal Apparatus pp201 - 240.
  24. The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology (8th Edition) by Keith L. Moore and T.V.N Persaud - Moore & Persaud Chapter Chapter 9 The Pharyngeal Apparatus pp201 - 240.
  25. Michael J Dixon, Mary L Marazita, Terri H Beaty, Jeffrey C Murray Cleft lip and palate: understanding genetic and environmental influences. Nat. Rev. Genet.: 2011, 12(3);167-78 PMID:21331089
  26. Won-Jong Oh, Joby J Westmoreland, Ryan Summers, Brian G Condie Cleft palate is caused by CNS dysfunction in Gad1 and Viaat knockout mice. PLoS ONE: 2010, 5(3);e9758 PMID:20333300

Wow!! That is sad Meedo! I didnt know you were in hospital! Yes I think the condition is cleft lip and palate however I am working on the classifications of cleft lip as they can be disjoint at many different sites of the lip. --Tahmina Lata 10:11, 18 August 2011 (EST)

Fantasitc Work Tahmina!!!! I can See a flow coming up!!! and z3292953 - Great Photos!!!! Please save the references somewhere Safe :D

As for me, I haven't been able to attend classes since Thursday. I was at the hospital, extremely dysfunctional.

Anyways, I can say that we should finilize the topic to This one... I prefer not to change because it's week 5 now. It will be wise if we dig deeper in the topic and we shall get better information. I will start my search from tomorrow and sorry for the delay. I HAVE ONLY ONE QUESTION IS CLEFT PALATE and LIP KNOWN as the WHOLE condition??? --z3284061 23:46, 17 August 2011 (EST)

History

The earliest known history of cleft lip is based on a combination of religion, superstition, invention and charlatanism. While Greeks were indifferent of their existence, Spartans and Romans would kill the children with this condition as they were considered to harbour evil spirits.

Between (1295- 1351) the first to note the congenital origin of the cleft was made by Jean Yperman. He also classified the various forms of the condition and laid down the principles for their treatment.

Between (1537-1619) Fabricius ab Aquapendente first suggested the embryological basis of cleft lip.

This is how I started the history, please comment if you think anything needs changing. I will continue the list on and the references at the end.

--Tahmina Lata 20:00, 16 August 2011 (EST)


File-Cleft palate in newborn mice.jpg [1]


--z3292953 12:08, 16 August 2011 (EST)

Hi Guys, I have started working on pathophysiology & history and modified some of the headings to include ones that were more relevant for Cleft palate and Lip.

--Tahmina Lata 21:51, 15 August 2011 (EST)

Alt
Mice mutants exhibit cleft palate and umbilical hernia[2]

Mice mutants exhibit cleft palate and umbilical hernia

--Tahmina Lata 19:16, 15 August 2011 (EST)

So after careful consideration we have come to realise that Cleft Palate/Lip will be a more relevant topic to create a page about. Some of you guys left last week when we registered this topic with Dr Hill. Please post here if you are still unsure of the topic. At this stage we are all reseraching different things on the topic so we can discuss about it this week.

--Tahmina Lata 16:44, 15 August 2011 (EST)

There appears to be no group discussion here on possible project topics?? --Mark Hill 23:55, 7 August 2011 (EST)

We have decided to research each subheading listed on the Group Project page and then share all the information found next week. We will then be able to determine a clearer structure to the page based on what literature is available.

--Tahmina Lata 12:34, 11 August 2011 (EST)

Review Article "Cystic fibrosis: pathogenesis and future treatment strategies"-This review summarizes our current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease[3]

Research Article "Nasal endoscopic evaluation of children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis"-The questionnaire, clinical examination and especially nasal endoscopy performed as part of this research lead to a detailed assessment of the nasal characteristics of children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. [4]

--Tahmina Lata 23:13, 10 August 2011 (EST)

Hi Guys,

I've modified the page with the required subheadings, we can change them later but it's important to get our heads around the foundations.

If have have anything to add, please do so. if you have any questions, post it here and we will try and help. --z3284061 22:52, 10 August 2011 (EST)


Novel concepts in evaluating antimicrobial therapy for bacterial lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis.Rogers GB, Hoffman LR, Döring G. J Cyst Fibros.2011 Jul 18. [Epub ahead of print]

Vitamin D receptor agonists inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokine production from the respiratory epithelium in cystic fibrosis.McNally P, Coughlan C, Bergsson G, Doyle M, Taggart C, Adorini L, Uskokovic MR, El-Nazir B, Murphy P, Greally P, Greene CM, McElvaney NG.J Cyst Fibros. 2011 Jul 22.

--z3292953 15:59, 9 August 2011 (EST)


Hey Guys:

How are we going in the research process? Well, In case anyone wants to change the topic Tomorrow will be the last day we get to change! That’s if everyone agrees to do so.

For the time being, we are working on Cystic Fibrosis. I’ve found some interesting articles regarding the treatment. The first one is a research while the other 2 are both Reviews.

I’ve Moved the articles of z3292953 to the discussion Page :)

Looking forward to create a great wiki page. --z3284061 22:34, 10 August 2011 (EST)


1. Effect of VX-770 in Persons with Cystic Fibrosis and the G551D-CFTR Mutation


Effect of VX-770 in Persons with Cystic Fibrosis and the G551D-CFTR Mutation


2. Recent advances in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis


Abstract

Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy. New results from one small trial suggest that addition of oral ciprofloxacin to inhaled tobramycin may reduce lung inflammation. Clinical trials with new formulations of old antibiotics for inhalation therapy (aztreonam lysine) against chronic P. aeruginosa infection improved patient-reported outcome, lung function, time to acute exacerbations and sputum density of P. aeruginosa. Other drugs such as quinolones are currently under investigation for inhalation therapy. A trial of the use of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics for long-term prophylaxis showed no effect in patients who were not already infected. Use of azithromycin to treat CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection did not improve lung function. Here I review the recent advances in the treatment of
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